The Multiplication of Fishes

Aquaculture is just one of seven interest areas biological sciences majors may choose. What better place to study it than at a university that is ten minutes from a river and just 15 minutes from the ocean? You'll find these students at the Indian River Lagoon peering at native species or conducting field studies at the Atlantic Ocean. In the saltwater ecosystem, they examine the sea grass vital to many species' survival or explore the natural habitats of marine life such as pipefish, seahorses and starfish. On campus, students study mollusk, crustacean and finfish aquaculture— the highly adaptive tilapia, for one. The department's reef tank offers a look at tropical varieties like the brightly striped clownfish and multicolored corals. In the lab, a project might be the invasive lionfish or microalgae culture and its potential for alternative fuel. The university's Vero Beach Marine Laboratory, sitting smack on the beach, is a bastion of marine science research and education as well as a commercial aquaculture facility. Wouldn't it be exciting to cultivate the next major species of marine food that could feed millions?