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Florida Tech Information Assurance Meeting: The Bitter Taste of Java

03/18/2013

MELBOURNE, FLA.—The Harris Institute for Assured Information at Florida Institute of Technology and the Space Coast Chapter of the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA) present a monthly lecture series on security trends and topics. This month’s meeting, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for March 21 at 6:30 p.m. in the third-floor conference room of the Harris Center for Science and Engineering Building on the Florida Tech campus.

The Institute will host Scott Tilley, professor of software engineering, and director of the Harris Institute for Information Assurance, Florida Tech, who will present “The Bitter Taste of Java.”

Tilley will discuss the programming language Java, which started life with such promise in 1995 and has mutated into a computer monster. As a reaction to attacks on key defenses, it is constantly patched and updated, and has become one of the leading sources of security vulnerability. The Java runtime environment has become too complex for the average user to manage and Tilley’s opinion, Java is past salvaging.

“The community needs to acknowledge that they are in a deep hole and to stop digging. A fresh approach is needed to wash out the bitter taste of the old Java,” he said.

Tilley is also a professor of information systems in Florida Tech’s Nathan M. Bisk College of Business, an associate member of the university’s Harris Institute for Assured Information and a visiting scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute. He chairs the steering committee for the IEEE Web Systems Evolution series of events and is a past chair of the Association for Computer Machinery’s (ACM) Special Interest Group on Design Communication (SIGDOC). He was general chair for the 24th IEEE International Conference on Software Maintenance (ICSM 2008), which took place in Beijing. He is an ACM Distinguished Lecturer and writes the weekly “Technology Today” column for the Florida Today newspaper. His recent books include Software Testing in the Cloud: Migration and Execution (Springer, 2012) and Software Testing in the Cloud: Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline (IGI Global, 2012)

For more information, contact Richard Ford at (321) 674-7473.

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