Sustainability Studies Degree

7039
Bachelor of Science
Classroom
No
Undergraduate
Main Campus - Melbourne
Major Code: 7039 Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Science
Age Restriction: N Admission status: undergraduate 
Delivery Mode/s: classroom only Location/s: main campus

Sustainability professionals use combinations of interdisciplinary skills to create and manage complex social, environmental and economic systems within a wide array of occupations. The program curricula expands on Florida Tech's well-known science and technology strengths and adds a unique combination of business and social science courses to produce unusually well-rounded graduates who can operate across multiple disciplines in the workforce.

The program emphasizes advanced educational experiences, hands-on projects (individually and in teams), opportunities for research on campus or internships in the community and training graduates to excel in the changing job market or interdisciplinary graduate schools. Final capstone projects use a campus classroom model where students address real-world sustainability challenges to generate explicit products and build marketable skills.

Admission Requirements

Students intending to apply should complete at least one year of high school environmental sciences or biology, and at least one year of chemistry or physics. Courses in economics or business are encouraged but not required.

Admissions requirements and the process for applying are presented in the Academic Overview section.

Degree Requirements

Candidates must successfully complete 124 semester credit hours as outlined in the following curriculum. The program includes four areas of concentration (business and economics, environmental sciences, social sciences, technology and engineering). Students are required to successfully complete 24 semester credit hours from the concentration areas (six credits from each).

To encourage students to focus on areas of greatest individual interest, students take an additional 15 semester credit hours from one or more of the concentration areas in consultation with their academic advisor.

Curriculum
Freshman Year
Fall (14 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • ASC 1000 University Experience
    Credit Hours: 1
    Helps first-year students adjust to the university and acquire essential academic survival skills (classroom behavior, academic honesty, study skills, etc.) that enhance academic and social integration into college.
  • COM 1101 Composition and Rhetoric
    Credit Hours: 3
    The first of two courses in college-level writing skills. Focuses on writing essays using various rhetorical modes: persuasion, description, comparison and analysis. Presents basic methods of library research, as well as the MLA documentation system. Students write one research paper and several essays.
    Requirement(s):
    Passing grade on placement exam or prerequisite course
  • ENS 1001 The Whole Earth Course
    Credit Hours: 3
    Consists of six interrelated modules (cosmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, anthroposphere) taught by faculty of the College of Engineering, College of Aeronautics and College of Science. Emphasizes the interactions and interdependence of Earth systems. Includes the role of humans in global change.
  • ISC 1500 Introduction to Sustainability
    Credit Hours: 3
    Uses lectures, reading and discussions to explore the biological, environmental, economic, technological, humanistic and social science aspects of sustainable resource use and development.
  • MTH 1001 Calculus 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Functions and graphs, limits and continuity, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions, chain rule; applications to maxima and minima, and to related rates. Exponential logarithmic, circular and hyperbolic functions: their inverses, derivatives and integrals.
    Requirement(s):
    High school algebra and trigonometry, and a passing score on the placement test, or prerequisite course
Spring (17 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BIO 1020 Biological Discovery 2
    Credit Hours: 4
    The second of a two-semester sequence on the scientific approach to biology. Continues an integrated approach to the study of the hierarchal structure and function of living systems, including the origin and history of life on Earth.
  • BUS 1801 Global Business Perspectives
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys the functions and operations of business organizations in a global marketplace. Studies the structure, operation, financing, relationships and responsibilities of firms in context of current legal, social, regulatory and environmental issues. Requires critical thinking, communication, research, and individual and group problem solving.
  • COM 1102 Writing About Literature
    Credit Hours: 3
    The second of two courses in college-level writing skills. Focuses on reading and analyzing poems, plays and short works of fiction. Students write several essays and one research paper on literary topics.
  • MTH 1002 Calculus 2
    Credit Hours: 4
    Integration and applications of integration, further techniques of integration, improper integrals, limits, l'Hospital's rule, sequences and series, numerical methods, polar coordinates and introductory differential equations.
  • Technical Elective Credit Hours: 3
Sophomore Year
Fall (17 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BUS 2303 Macroeconomics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the concepts that aid in understanding both aggregate economic conditions and the policy alternatives designed to stabilize national economies. Includes the determination of GDP and national income, inflation, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth and exchange rates.
  • CHM 1101 General Chemistry 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Covers fundamental principles of modern chemistry, including stoichiometry, properties of gases, liquids and solids, thermochemistry, atomic structure, properties of solutions and equilibrium. Includes lab component.
  • COM 2223 Scientific and Technical Communication
    Credit Hours: 3
    Practice in the technical and scientific writing style and format, including gathering and using data to prepare reports. Includes abstracts, reports, letters, technical descriptions, proposals and at least two oral presentations.
  • HUM 2051 Civilization 1: Ancient Through Medieval
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces civilization from its early development to the European Renaissance. Emphasizes the interpretation of primary texts that reflect the intellectual and historical changes in society. The first of two interdisciplinary courses.
  • PHY 1001 Physics 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Includes vectors; mechanics of particles; Newton's laws of motion; work, energy and power; impulse and momentum; conservation laws; mechanics of rigid bodies, rotation, equilibrium; fluids, heat and thermodynamics; and periodic motion.
Spring (15 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BIO 2801 Biometry
    Credit Hours: 4
    Experimental design and hypothesis testing in the biological sciences, and the analysis of biological data using descriptive statistics and applying parametric and non-parametric tests. Computer applications include statistical packages, spreadsheets, graphics preparation and word processing in the development of reports on modules of field-, clinic- and lab-based studies.
  • CHM 1102 General Chemistry 2
    Credit Hours: 4
    Continues . Covers acids and bases, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, descriptive chemistry of metals and nonmetals, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry. Introduces organic chemistry. Includes lab component.
  • PHY 2002 Physics 2
    Credit Hours: 4
    Includes electricity and magnetism, Coulomb's law, electric fields, potential capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic fields, fields due to currents, induction, magnetic properties; and wave motion, vibration and sound, interference and diffraction.
  • Humanities Core Course Credit Hours: 3
Junior Year
Fall (15 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • ENS 4300 Renewable Energy and the Environment
    Credit Hours: 3
    Understanding human energy needs; alternative generating systems; renewable sources including biomass, hydro, ocean current, solar and wind; socioeconomic implications of sustainable energy.
  • Concentration Course Credit Hours: 3
  • Concentration Course (Environmental Sciences) Credit Hours: 3
  • Concentration Course (Social Sciences) Credit Hours: 3
  • Technical Elective Credit Hours: 3
Spring (15 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • HUM 3385 Special Topics in History
    Credit Hours: 3
    Offers an opportunity for in-depth analysis of a historical problem or event. Includes a wide range of possibilities. Topics announced before registration.
  • ISC 3250 Systems, Governance and Sustainability
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines systems principles for sustainable governance from fields including complexity theory, cybernetics, social networks and risk communications. Covers such system attributes as feedback loops, response delays, traps, resilience, thresholds and system evolution. Also covers best practices for sustaining complex adaptive systems.
  • Concentration Courses Credit Hours: 6
  • Concentration Course (Business and Economics) Credit Hours: 3
Senior Year
Fall (16 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BUS 4426 Environmental and Resource Economics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the behavioral sources of environmental problems. Includes property rights, externalities, cost-benefit analysis, depletable and recyclable resources, pollution control, population growth, sustainable development, ecotourism and environmental justice.
  • ISC 3999 Sustainability Project Design
    Credit Hours: 1
    Develops basic components of project and team management. Requires design of a sustainability project by a team or individual in preparation for the sustainability capstone project in . Includes evaluation of multiple alternatives and presentation of a schedule and cost estimate.
  • Concentration Course Credit Hours: 3
  • Concentration Course (Business and Economics) Credit Hours: 3
  • Concentration Course (Social Sciences) Credit Hours: 3
  • Concentration Course (Technology and Engineering) Credit Hours: 3
Spring (15 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • ISC 4000 Applied Sustainability
    Credit Hours: 3
    Requires the design, production and presentation of an individual or group project on improving the sustainable operation of some aspect of the Florida Tech main campus, Florida Tech satellite location or another approved location.
    Requirement(s):
    Permission of the instructor
  • ISC 4350 Sustainability Economics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys emerging topics in sustainable business and ecological economics. Includes measurement of social and environmental capital via triple bottom-line accounting and other tools. Covers the economics of renewable and fossil energy and carbon accounting, and the behaviors of coupled systems when externalities are included.
  • Concentration Course Credit Hours: 3
  • Concentration Course (Environmental Sciences) Credit Hours: 3
  • Concentration Course (Technology and Engineering) Credit Hours: 3
Total Credits Required: 124
Concentration Courses
Business and Economics
Choose From:
  • BUS 2304 Microeconomics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the neoclassical theory of price determination. Includes supply and demand analysis, production and cost theory, market structures, externalities and public goods, factor payments, income distribution and informational asymmetries.
  • BUS 2601 Legal and Social Environments of Business
    Credit Hours: 3
    Investigates the operational responsibilities of business in light of political, moral, social, ethical and jurisprudential considerations.
  • BUS 2602 Environmental Law and Forensic Studies
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the U.S. legal and environmental policy framework implemented through laws and the courts. Consulting forensics about environmental liabilities, responsible parties, international issues and legally defensible data are presented in cases about air/water pollution, toxic substance regulation and resource management.
  • BUS 3501 Management Principles
    Credit Hours: 3
    Helps students acquire management knowledge and develop management skills. Enables the student to understand management as it relates to both the employer and employee, and acquaints the student with the various schools of management and the philosophy of management.
  • BUS 3605 Consumer Behavior
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines the consumer decision-making process and its societal, cultural, environmental, group and economic determinants. Includes consumer motivations, values, wants and needs. Teaches how to develop marketing strategies that effectively serve consumers, and how to use the managerial perspective to improve marketing strategy decisions.
  • BUS 3801 Cross-Cultural Management
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines the importance of effectively managing soft skills in a global organizational context. Specifically emphasizes the impact of national culture in shaping values, behaviors and employment practices in organizations operating within a global environment.
  • BUS 3802 Global Macroeconomic Issues
    Credit Hours: 3
    Explores the macroeconomic interdependence of global economics. Examines the working of monetary and fiscal policies under various exchange-rate regimes and uses international case studies to assess the policy trilemma, the trade-off among exchange rate stability, price stability and independent monetary policy.
  • BUS 4219 Globalization and Corporate Social Responsibility
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines globalization as it relates to corporate social responsibility (CSR). Analyzes policies and standards, and gives guidance on developing compliance programs and managing relations with key stakeholders. Reviews trends in corporate citizenship, social enterprise and philanthropy. Offers innovative strategies for ethical leadership.
  • BUS 4425 Environmental and Urban Planning
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the concepts and implementation strategies for productive urban and environmental planning.
    Requirement(s):
    Senior standing or prerequisite course
  • BUS 4503 Business Ethics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Applies moral reasoning to work-related challenges encountered in modern organizations. Students consider personal values and organizational values in examining organizational culture as a metaphor for the moral environment of organization. Uses cases from business and government to help students practice.
  • BUS 4504 Special Topics in Management
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes subjects or issues that are of current concern to business and government organizations. Also provides students with an opportunity to study in greater depth, topics that may have been just surveyed in other courses. Normally requires a research paper. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits.
  • BUS 4520 Leadership Theory and Practice
    Credit Hours: 3
    Reviews and analyzes classical and contemporary leadership theories. Emphasizes how each approach can be applied in real-world organizations.
  • BUS 4701 International Business
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the environmental factors confronting managers in international operations: cultural, economic, legal, political and institutional determinants. Examines problems associated with managing organizational, financial, marketing and production policies in a global marketplace.
  • BUS 4801 International Trade
    Credit Hours: 3
    Investigates why nations trade, what they trade and how they benefit from exchange. Includes topics on classical, neoclassical, modern and post-modern theories of trade; commercial policy instruments and their welfare effects; economic integration; international factor movements; and trade development.
Environmental Sciences
Choose From:
  • BIO 2935 Field Biology and Ecology/Smoky Mountains
    Credit Hours: 3
    Field biology and ecology methodology are discussed, demonstrated and applied in the field to collect data for analysis. Field studies are conducted in the Smoky Mountains.
  • BIO 2955 Field Biology and Ecology/Coral Reefs
    Credit Hours: 3
    Field biology and ecology methodology are discussed, demonstrated and applied in the field to collect data for analysis. Field studies are conducted in the Caribbean.
  • BIO 3410 General Ecology
    Credit Hours: 4
    Studies the distribution and abundance of organisms, with emphasis at the level of biological populations. Interaction of populations with the abiotic environment, energetics, population growth, reproduction, competition, predation, adaptation and evolution. Modular lab exercises stress the experimental design and conduct, and data analysis.
  • BIO 3510 Invertebrate Zoology
    Credit Hours: 4
    Lectures and labs on the origins and adaptive radiation of the kingdom Metazoa, including comparative structure and function of living and extinct animal phyla, evolution of organ system, and comparative physiology and ecology.
  • BIO 3601 Field Methods in Fisheries Science
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes lectures and intensive field/laboratory work covering the theory and practice of fisheries science techniques. Applies these techniques to development of fishery and habitat management strategies for fish populations. Includes field studies and examination of fisheries in the Indian River Lagoon and South Florida.
  • BIO 3625 Molluscan Aquaculture
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the basic biology, life history and culture techniques of the major commercially important molluscs. Covers culture procedures for microalgae. Includes labs culturing selected microalgal species, and spawning and larviculture of selected bivalve species.
  • BIO 3940 Tropical Marine Ecology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes intensive fieldwork focusing on tropical marine ecosystems and their biological communities. Emphasizes biodiversity, the ecology of dominant taxa, interactions between physical and biological processes, and the structure and function of representative communities.
  • BIO 4030 Conservation Biology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies biodiversity and population responses to human activity. Highlights decision-making and the active management of populations and habitats. Investigates the science underlying conservation of plant and animal communities (terrestrial and marine) and ecosystems. Pays special attention to the need to develop conservation strategies that accommodate climate change.
  • BIO 4410 Community Ecology
    Credit Hours: 4
    Studies the composition and distribution of biological communities and the community responses to wildlife management, changing climates and other abiotic factors. Includes ecosystems, biogeography, biodiversity, paleoecology, pollution, population manipulation and successions. Modular lab exercises stress experimental design and data analysis in studying communities.
  • BIO 4421 Neotropical Archeoecology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the impact of human activities on past and present ecology. Integrates regional archaeology with modern ecology to compare sites with and without past human impacts. Uses field techniques that include forest census in megadiverse environments, sediment coring and curation of specimens.
  • BIO 4515 Ecology of Coral Reefs
    Credit Hours: 3
    Broadly examines coral reefs from reef geology and geomorphology to conservation and management, including the physical environment, coral and symbiosis, reproduction, demography, community dynamics, diversity and function, biogeography and evolution, and natural and anthropogenic disturbances.
  • BIO 4517 Introduction to Modeling for Ecology and Biology
    Credit Hours: 4
    Includes allometric principles, biological processes within organisms, population and metapopulation models, competition and symbiosis, predator-prey relations, community and diversity, and models in evolution, biogeography, ecosystems and conservation.
  • BIO 4530 Biology of Fishes
    Credit Hours: 4
    Introduces the structure, evolution, behavior and ecology of freshwater and marine fishes. Labs examine the anatomy, physiology and ecology of fishes. Includes field collection trips to local marine and freshwater habitats.
  • BIO 4620 Fish Aquaculture and Management
    Credit Hours: 4
    Surveys in depth the culture methods of freshwater and saltwater fish species including an introduction to the theory and techniques necessary for managing wild fisheries stocks. Labs focus on fish culturing methodology and analysis of wild fish populations. Includes several field studies.
  • BIO 4641 Biology of Marine Mammals
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the evolution, classification, ecology and general life history of marine mammals.
  • BIO 4720 Marine Ecology
    Credit Hours: 4
    Covers the structure and function of marine biotic systems from the organism (life histories) to community and ecosystem.
  • ENS 3101 Atmospheric Environments
    Credit Hours: 3
    Origin, fate, effects and distribution of air pollutants. Covers dispersion modeling, federal and state legislation, source control and monitoring.
  • ENS 4001 The Earth System: Science, Engineering, Management and Education
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes a series of seminar-style presentations by faculty, invited lecturers and students. Covers holistically understanding Earth as a system and the complexities of interactions between the near-Earth space environment, the solid Earth, the fluid Earth and the living Earth including humankind.
  • ENS 4004 Aquatic Environmental Toxicology
    Credit Hours: 3
    The concepts of toxicology, classifications, kinetics of biological effects and environmental sampling and testing. Includes the effect of environmental agents on aquatic systems and the fate of chemicals in the environment.
  • ENS 4010 Geographic Information Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Concepts and applications of geographic information systems (GIS). Presents case studies from environmental and geoscience applications.
  • ENS 4700 Environmental Hydrology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers descriptive and quantitative aspects of surface and groundwater hydrology, emphasizing both data interpretation and measurement methodology. Stresses subject areas of particular importance to environmental scientists and meteorologists.
  • ENS 4701 Environmental Regulation and Impact Assessment
    Credit Hours: 3
    Analyzes environmental legislation and the impacts and implications of these regulations on society. Emphasizes environmental impact analysis and environmental impact statement preparation methods.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or senior standing
  • MET 4310 Climatology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the distribution of weather elements globally, continental positioning, rain shields, hydrological cycle, meteorological databases, El Nino impacts on humans, global warming and the anthropogenic greenhouse effect.
  • MTH 2332 Primer for Biomath
    Credit Hours: 1
    Introduces the separate languages of mathematics and biology such that students from the different disciplines can efficiently develop a biomath glossary to communicate with one another. Focuses on the current research projects in biology and ecology, and the relevant mathematical analysis.
  • OCN 1010 Oceanography
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys oceanography including biological, chemical, geological and physical processes in the ocean. Includes field trips.
  • OCN 2407 Meteorology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces meteorological phenomena and principles, including descriptive weather elements, general atmospheric circulation, air-sea interaction and the physical mechanisms that create atmospheric motions, mixing and transfer of momentum, mass and heat.
  • OCN 2602 Environmental Geology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Reviews the internal and external processes that have shaped Earth's surface and how an understanding of these processes can be used to successfully manage modern problems of organization and mineral exploration. Successful management of environmental and geological hazards relies on an understanding of the basic principles of physical geology.
  • OCN 3101 Biological Oceanography
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes relationships of biological, chemical, geological and physical aspects of the oceans to biological oceanography. Instructor advisement suggested;  lab may not be required as corequisite.
  • OCN 3111 Biological Oceanography Laboratory
    Credit Hours: 1
    Students receive field and lab experience in the use of equipment and methods in biological oceanography studies.
  • OCN 3201 Marine and Environmental Chemistry
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes a systematic examination of seawater and its constituent parts; problems associated with ocean chemistry; interaction of chemical parameters with other ocean studies; and an evaluation of the ocean as an environment.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or prerequisite course
  • OCN 3211 Marine and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory
    Credit Hours: 1
    Field and lab exercises provide practical experience in the use of equipment and methods for measuring common chemical parameters in marine and environmental chemistry.
  • OCN 3301 Geological Oceanography
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces geological oceanography; origin and evolution of ocean basins. Includes a survey of major neritic and oceanic sediment patterns and the processes that control their distribution over time and space; and paleoceanography.
  • OCN 3311 Geological Oceanography Laboratory
    Credit Hours: 1
    Field and lab exercises provide experience in the use of equipment and methods relevant to geologic investigations of the ocean.
  • OCN 4102 Marine and Estuarine Phytoplankton
    Credit Hours: 3
    Systematic and ecological studies of marine phytoplankton; discussions of environmental parameters that affect primary production and plankton distribution; and collection, sampling, culturing methods, lab techniques and field trips.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or prerequisite course
  • OCN 4103 Marine and Estuarine Zooplankton
    Credit Hours: 3
    Systematic and ecological studies of marine zooplankton; discussions of parameters that affect secondary production; phytoplankton-zooplankton relationships, patchiness, migration and distribution; and collection, sampling, lab techniques and field trips.)
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or prerequisite course
  • OCN 4104 Marine and Estuarine Benthos
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies population and community ecology of marine soft-sediment systems from shallow water and deep sea; rocky intertidal ecology; and ecology of seagrass systems.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or prerequisite course
  • OCN 4106 Mitigation and Restoration of Coastal Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces current activities in mitigation and restoration of coastal systems. Integrates lectures, guest speakers and field trips in a case-study format to demonstrate the process of restoration planning. Students develop a mitigation plan for a hypothetical development project.
  • OCN 4204 Marine and Environmental Pollution
    Credit Hours: 3
    A holistic approach to the study of pollution. Defines and discusses pollutants, quantities, sources and their impacts. Considers past and present waste disposal techniques and proposed alternatives.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or prerequisite course
Social Sciences
Choose From:
  • BEH 3465 Applied Behavior Analysis
    Credit Hours: 3
    Applies operant and respondent conditioning processes to the modification of human behavior in business, community, education and clinical settings. Includes analysis of situational components, measurements of behavior, application of basic behavior analytic skills and understanding the significance of results.
  • COM 3242 Journalism
    Credit Hours: 3
    Presents the methods and practice of newsgathering, news writing and news editing. Focuses on style, clarity, accuracy and responsibility in handling news. Emphasizes enterprise, documentation and using multiple sources. Includes the use of standard reference materials and public records.
  • COM 3425 Mass Communication
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies media influence from political, social and cultural perspectives. Examines theory and media effects in its survey of film, print, broadcast and new technologies. Discusses the role of media in society and culture, issues related to the First Amendment and the implications of media mergers.
  • COM 4130 Global Communication
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines the elements of cross-cultural communication by analyzing the interface between the organization and its cultural environment. Focuses on developing skills to improve communication across both language and cultural barriers in a diverse domestic workplace and an international business environment.
  • HUM 1540 Ethics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Explores ethical theories in the context of contemporary moral problems. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment and torture.
  • HUM 2480 Introduction to Political Science
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces students to the theories and concepts of political science. Emphasizes examining the interaction between ideas, values and institutions in contemporary U.S. political culture.
  • HUM 2570 Bioethics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies ethical questions raised by 20th century technology as they affect medicine, ecology and social issues.
  • HUM 3085 Special Topics in Humanities
    Credit Hours: 3
    Offers interdisciplinary study of a particular period, movement, genre or individual that embraces more than a single humanistic discipline. Topics announced before registration.
  • HUM 3351 History of Science and Technology: Ancient and Medieval
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys the origins of science in antiquity and the Middle Ages. Includes development of mathematical, physical and biological thought in the ancient and medieval period, and the relationship between science, technology and religion.
  • HUM 3352 History of Science and Technology: Renaissance to Present
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys the principal developments in science, mathematics and technology from the Renaissance to the present. Includes scientific revolution, development of modern biology and the relationship between technology and science.
  • HUM 3485 Special Topics in Social Science
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies a particular social group or institution, social process or social change. Topics announced before registration.
  • HUM 3521 World Religions
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces religion and examines the philosophy of religion. Religion is seen as humanity's attempt to grapple with the question of the meaning of life, the forms that religious perspectives have taken and the universal aspects of human existence.
  • PSY 1411 Introduction to Psychology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Overviews psychological processes, including both areas in which psychology is a natural science (physiological psychology, sensation and perception, basic learning and cognition) and a social science (motivation, human development, personality, social interaction, psychopathology and psychotherapy).
  • PSY 2444 Cross-Cultural and Ethnic Psychology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines the relationship between cultural variables and psychological processes from both a psychological and an anthropological perspective. Addresses cultural, international and ethnic issues.
  • PSY 2541 Group Behavior
    Credit Hours: 3
    Considers issues of group development, socialization, productivity, decision making and leadership. Emphasizes the application of scientific theory and research to the study of group dynamics in real world group situations. Includes cult and crowd phenomena, social loafing, group therapy, work groups and sports teams.
  • PSY 3421 Psychology of Learning and Motivation
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the principles of learning and motivation based primarily on infrahuman studies in classical and instrumental conditioning. Focuses on procedures, theories and applications.
  • PSY 3441 Social Psychology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys the areas of social psychology as it has evolved in American psychology, including its history, methods and theories of intrapersonal, interpersonal and group behavior. Reviews sociological approaches to social psychology and cultural processes that affect social phenomena.
  • PSY 3541 Psychology of Leadership
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines the research and application of the essential competencies of effective leadership such as managing conflict, facilitating communication and leading groups and teams.
  • PSY 3543 Psychology of the Workplace
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the many ways psychology is applied in organizations to improve performance and quality of work life. Includes employee selection and personnel law, performance management, training, motivation, job attitudes, stress, teamwork, leadership and organizational development.
  • PSY 4541 Culture and Psychology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Presents a theoretical basis for understanding the relationship between psychology and social science fields involving cultural studies, including cross-cultural psychology, psychological anthropology, cultural psychology, psychological sociology, ethnicity and multiculturalism. Emphasizes quantitative research methodology in these fields.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval
Technology and Engineering
Choose From:
  • AVM 3201 Aviation Planning
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the student to the requirements, issues and processes involved in aviation planning. Includes in-depth study of the sources of aviation data, forecasting methods, the airport master planning process and environmental issues and requirements.
  • AVM 3202 Airport Design
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes analysis and application of FAA standards for airport design. Emphasizes the airside components. Also includes airport capacity calculations; movement area geometry; pavement, runway, and taxiway design; (FAR Part 77), approach and departure gradients, terminal building concepts and heliports.
  • AVS 2402 Introduction to Aviation Environmental Science
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces basic principles of environmental science directly applicable to the aviation industry. Includes air and water quality, contaminants of concern, properties of contaminants and air quality measurements at airports.
  • AVS 4402 Aviation Sustainability
    Credit Hours: 3
    Focuses on developing a sustainable aviation infrastructure. Discusses the principles of sustainability in aviation, monitoring and analyzing the airfield transport system, alternative fuels and biotechnology in aviation.
  • CHE 3170 Introduction to Environmental Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the field of environmental engineering that emphasizes the interrelationships among air, water and land pollution and the effect of ecological, economic and sociological constraints on the solution of environmental problems.
  • CHM 2001 Organic Chemistry 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the fundamentals of structure and reaction mechanisms. Includes a review of bonding, preparations and reactions of organic substances.
  • CHM 2002 Organic Chemistry 2
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the fundamentals of structure and reaction mechanisms. Includes a review of bonding, preparations and reactions of organic substances.
  • CHM 4222 Environmental Chemistry
    Credit Hours: 3
    Applies basic principles of inorganic and organic chemistry to natural systems. Includes applications of terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric chemistry.
  • CON 1005 Construction Plan Reading and BIM Applications
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces construction plans, specifications and codes necessary to organize and supervise construction projects. Covers interpretation of construction plans, formats, symbols and scales as they apply to architectural, structural mechanical and electrical construction methods. Introduces building information modeling (BIM) through hands-on exercises.
  • CON 2001 Construction Methods and Operations
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the operational processes for horizontal and vertical construction. Includes reading construction plans and building codes. Requires a team project, field trips and written reports on observations of project management and the use of equipment in the construction process.
  • CON 3002 Building Mechanical and HVAC Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Provides basic knowledge of building mechanical systems, and methods to estimate, install and verify the systems. Covers basic engineering principles of design associated with mechanical systems. Includes understanding of codes and the principles of design and materials used in the construction of plumbing, HVAC and transportation systems.
  • CON 4003 Construction Estimating, Bidding and Value Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the basics of construction contracts, construction business methods, bidding, construction insurance and value engineering. Includes principles of cost estimating and value analysis of construction projects, classification of work, quality take-offs, construction operations cost, bidding operations and time value of money.
  • CSE 1301 Introduction to Computer Applications
    Credit Hours: 3
    Overviews computers and terminology. Identifies appropriate problems and solution design using specific applications packages. Introduces the use of word processors, data managers, spreadsheets and the Internet (email and Web browsers).
    Requirement(s):
    College of Engineering majors may only use as Free Elective.
  • CVE 1000 Introduction to Civil Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the civil engineering sub-disciplines, including professional aspects and ethics. Uses hands-on group projects, group presentations, field trips and lectures. Includes exposure to structures, soils, transportation, hydrology, construction and the environment. Emphasizes technical communication and computer skills through all coursework.
  • CVE 3042 Water and Wastewater Systems for Land Development
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the topics necessary to design potable water and domestic wastewater utility systems for land development projects. Includes the treatment and distribution of potable water and the collection and treatment of wastewater.
  • CVE 3052 Municipal Water and Wastewater Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the topics necessary to design and develop large-scale potable water and domestic wastewater treatment facilities. Includes site planning; physical, chemical and biological treatment; sludge processing and advanced treatment methods.
  • CVE 4035 Urban Hydrology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Uses state-of-the-art water-quality and water-quantity computer models to predict the impact of urbanization on receiving waters. Students design a stormwater management system as a project.
  • CVE 4050 Solid and Hazardous Waste
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the design process used in investigation and remediation of sites contaminated with solid or hazardous waste. Also covers the processing, treatment and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes.
  • CVE 4070 Construction Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    The fundamentals of construction engineering from a project management point of view. Focus on basics of construction project management principles including scope, quality control, planning and scheduling, cost engineering, risk management and loss prevention, local environment, information and communications, and stakeholder relations.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or prerequisite course
  • MAE 4250 Physical Principles of Nuclear Reactors
    Credit Hours: 3
    Presents the fundamental physical principles of nuclear reactors. Covers the equivalence of matter and energy, nuclear reactions and radiation, neutron diffusion and slowing-down theory, criticality condition, reactor core, composition, configurations and long-term behavior, reactor kinetics and control.
  • OCE 1001 Introduction to Ocean Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    Applications of engineering methods to ocean engineering design case studies and problem solving, which involve the computer as an aid. Includes individual and team approaches and student presentations of case studies.
  • OCE 4518 Protection of Marine Materials
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the factors affecting the corrosion with regards to electrode potentials, polarization and passivity. Students learn designing to minimize the deleterious effects on metals, concrete and woods.
  • OCE 4522 Coastal Engineering Processes and Shoreline Design
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces engineering design in the dynamic coastal zone. Focuses on shoreline design and management, the physical processes of sandy beaches, coastal sediments, surf zone dynamics, beach profiles, cross-shore and alongshore sand transport, reaction of beaches to storms, coastal structures and sea-level rise.
  • OCE 4525 Coastal Engineering Structures
    Credit Hours: 3
    The design of nearshore and shorefront structures including seawalls, rubble-mound structures and beach nourishment. Also included is the study of bay inlet systems and dredging technology.
  • Additional classes may be substituted in consultation with the student's advisor and course instructor.