Construction Management Major

7045
Bachelor of Science
Classroom
No
Undergraduate
Main Campus - Melbourne
Major Code: 7045 Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Science
Age Restriction: N Admission Status: undergraduate
Delivery Mode/s: classroom only Location/s: main campus

Program Chair
Ralph V. Locurcio, M.S., P.E.

Professors
Edward H. Kalajian, Ph.D., P.E., geotechnical engineering, foundations, stabilization of waste materials.

Ralph V. Locurcio, M.S., P.E., construction management, project management, quality management, engineering leadership, disaster recovery, urban engineering, urban infrastructure, industrial relations.

Associate Professors
Albert M. Bleakley, Ph.D., P.E., construction management, project management, soil mechanics, structural systems, transportation engineering, safety.

Troy Nguyen, Ph.D., construction management, mechanical and electrical systems, renewable energy systems, systems engineering, building information modeling.

Mission Statement

The primary objective of the construction management degree is to provide an education that leads to a leadership role in the construction industry while preparing students to become responsible members of society.

The curriculum is responsive to current social, economic and technical developments in the field of construction, and reflects the application of evolving knowledge in construction management and the behavioral sciences. The program incorporates curricula that develop management skills to reflect changes in construction technology and
management trends, and has goals that closely reflect the needs of the construction profession and society as a whole.

The major is administered by the College of Engineering and was developed to provide a curriculum to meet the specific needs of the construction industry both in Florida and throughout the United States. Those needs include professionals who understand the basics of civil engineering and business subjects such as project management, contracting, budgeting and cost control. The program was designed with input from members of the Construction Industry Advisory Board (CIAB) at Florida Tech. The board meets twice yearly to review curriculum and performance of graduates, and to provide updates on industry trends. The curriculum meets Florida Tech's core requirements within the institutional framework established for all Florida Tech programs and is consistent with the institutional mission and assessment procedures of the university.

Curriculum

The curriculum consists of 13 courses designed specifically for the construction industry and 31 existing courses, for a total of 44 courses and 127 credit hours of instruction. The construction management major is designed to prepare students for immediate employment as construction management professionals, rather than as civil engineering design professionals.

The construction management major is designed to prepare students for professional careers and graduate school. During the first two years, the emphasis is on foundation courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics, engineering mechanics and business, augmented by practice-oriented civil engineering courses. The introductory construction courses include field trips and introduce the various disciplines of engineering and business management employed in the construction industry. The CAD laboratory course uses the latest CAD software, provides knowledge that is applied in the rest of the curriculum and serves as the basis for understanding, interpreting and using construction plans and specifications in construction operations.

During the second and third years, emphasis is on specific technical courses designed to provide a working knowledge of civil, electrical and mechanical engineering methods used in the design of both horizontal and vertical projects and in construction practice. In addition, business and management courses are added to develop analytical skills needed for making business and technical decisions during construction operations. The technical and business courses in the third and fourth years emphasize leadership, teamwork, oral and written communication, and ethics. The fourth year focuses on the application of these skills to real-world problems with emphasis on societal impacts and the integration of all skills into a seamless and profitable project scenario.

During the senior year, construction management majors are required to be part of a multidisciplinary capstone project team that identifies, formulates and builds a real-world construction project. In this capstone course, students must assemble information from previous courses and research current methods to accomplish project and societal goals.

Mandatory electives in humanities and social sciences provide a broader understanding of the professional work environment, human history and culture. The curriculum provides flexibility in the form of restricted and technical/business electives that allow further depth and breadth in a discipline of choice.

Freshman Year
Fall (15 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • ASC 1000 University Experience
    Credit Hours: 1
    Helps first-year students adjust to the university and acquire essential academic survival skills (classroom behavior, academic honesty, study skills, etc.) that enhance academic and social integration into college.
  • COM 1101 Composition and Rhetoric
    Credit Hours: 3
    The first of two courses in college-level writing skills. Focuses on writing essays using various rhetorical modes: persuasion, description, comparison and analysis. Presents basic methods of library research, as well as the MLA documentation system. Students write one research paper and several essays.
    Requirement(s):
    Passing grade on placement exam or prerequisite course
  • CON 1005 Construction Plan Reading and BIM Applications
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces construction plans, specifications and codes necessary to organize and supervise construction projects. Covers interpretation of construction plans, formats, symbols and scales as they apply to architectural, structural mechanical and electrical construction methods. Introduces building information modeling (BIM) through hands-on exercises.
  • CVE 1000 Introduction to Civil Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the civil engineering sub-disciplines, including professional aspects and ethics. Uses hands-on group projects, group presentations, field trips and lectures. Includes exposure to structures, soils, transportation, hydrology, construction and the environment. Emphasizes technical communication and computer skills through all coursework.
  • CVE 1001 Computer Applications Lab
    Credit Hours: 1
    Offers a broad background in computer applications, strongly emphasizing computer-aided design. Briefly discusses word processing, spreadsheet coding and PowerPoint® presentations.
  • MTH 1000 Precalculus
    Credit Hours: 4
    Algebra and trigonometry that are used to develop the skills needed in calculus. Required for students who have minimal algebra and/or trigonometry preparation, or whose placement test indicated such a need.
    Requirement(s):
    Passing score on placement exam or prerequisite course
Spring (17 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BUS 1301 Basic Economics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces basic macro- and microeconomic concepts. Includes the economic role of government, business and individuals. Seeks to acquaint the student with sufficient material to understand major concepts and terminology used in our economy and the global community.
    Requirement(s):
    College of Business majors may only use as Free Elective.
  • CHM 1101 General Chemistry 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Covers fundamental principles of modern chemistry, including stoichiometry, properties of gases, liquids and solids, thermochemistry, atomic structure, properties of solutions and equilibrium. Includes lab component.
  • COM 1102 Writing About Literature
    Credit Hours: 3
    The second of two courses in college-level writing skills. Focuses on reading and analyzing poems, plays and short works of fiction. Students write several essays and one research paper on literary topics.
  • MTH 1001 Calculus 1
    Credit Hours: 4
    Functions and graphs, limits and continuity, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions, chain rule; applications to maxima and minima, and to related rates. Exponential logarithmic, circular and hyperbolic functions: their inverses, derivatives and integrals.
    Requirement(s):
    High school algebra and trigonometry, and a passing score on the placement test, or prerequisite course
  • OCN 2602 Environmental Geology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Reviews the internal and external processes that have shaped Earth's surface and how an understanding of these processes can be used to successfully manage modern problems of organization and mineral exploration. Successful management of environmental and geological hazards relies on an understanding of the basic principles of physical geology.
Sophomore Year
Fall (17 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BUS 2211 Introduction to Financial Accounting
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the financial accounting environment, financial statements, the accounting cycle, and the theoretical framework of accounting measurement, emphasizing mechanics, measurement theory and the economic environment.
  • COM 2223 Scientific and Technical Communication
    Credit Hours: 3
    Practice in the technical and scientific writing style and format, including gathering and using data to prepare reports. Includes abstracts, reports, letters, technical descriptions, proposals and at least two oral presentations.
  • CON 2001 Construction Methods and Operations
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the operational processes for horizontal and vertical construction. Includes reading construction plans and building codes. Requires a team project, field trips and written reports on observations of project management and the use of equipment in the construction process.
  • HUM 2051 Civilization 1: Ancient Through Medieval
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces civilization from its early development to the European Renaissance. Emphasizes the interpretation of primary texts that reflect the intellectual and historical changes in society. The first of two interdisciplinary courses.
  • PHY 1999 Physical Concepts for Construction
    Credit Hours: 4
    Presents the basic concepts of physics as an essential foundation for understanding technical ideas such as statics, structures, materials, and electrical and mechanical systems. Provides a basis in physical science required for field work in the construction industry.
  • PHY 2091 Physics Laboratory 1
    Credit Hours: 1
    Experiments to elucidate concepts and relationships presented in , to develop understanding of the inductive approach and the significance of a physical measurement, and to provide some practice in experimental techniques and methods.
Spring (16 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BUS 2601 Legal and Social Environments of Business
    Credit Hours: 3
    Investigates the operational responsibilities of business in light of political, moral, social, ethical and jurisprudential considerations.
  • BUS 2212 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
    Credit Hours: 3
    Continues , emphasizing concepts and issues associated with the accounting and management of businesses, with particular emphasis on understanding the role of accounting in product costing, costing for quality, cost-justifying investment decisions, and performance evaluation and control of human behavior.
  • CON 2000 Statics and Mechanics for Construction
    Credit Hours: 4
    Introduces the physical principles that govern classical statics and strength of materials, and the design, analysis and use of wood, steel, timber, concrete and masonry materials in structural systems. Covers resistive systems for effects of wind and earthquakes. Includes field analysis of construction systems.
  • CVE 2080 Construction Measurements
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers measurement of distances, elevations and angles; statistical errors and data adjustment; working with coordinates; topographic mapping and photogrammetry; global positioning systems (GPS); geographic information systems (GIS); and computer applications.
  • Humanities Core Course Credit Hours: 3
Junior Year
Fall (16 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BUS 2703 Business Statistics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces methods of collection, analysis, and interpretation of data. Includes data presentation; measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability distributions; hypothesis testing; confidence interval estimation; analysis of variance; regression and correlation.
  • BUS 3501 Management Principles
    Credit Hours: 3
    Helps students acquire management knowledge and develop management skills. Enables the student to understand management as it relates to both the employer and employee, and acquaints the student with the various schools of management and the philosophy of management.
  • CVE 3012 Engineering Materials
    Credit Hours: 3
    Addresses stress-strain concepts and the relationship between internal structure and engineering properties as the basis for selection of materials. Materials studied include metals, concretes, timber, plastics and fiber composites.
  • CVE 3013 Civil Engineering Materials Lab
    Credit Hours: 1
    Offers experiments in measurement techniques, materials testing and engineering applications.
  • Humanities Elective Credit Hours: 3
  • Technical Elective Credit Hours: 3
Spring (15 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • BUS 3705 Managing Small Business
    Credit Hours: 3
    Focuses on the practical aspects of successfully launching and managing a small-business enterprise. Presents relevant topics that enable the student to better evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities, choose small business ownership, and to foresee potential pitfalls in operating a small business entity.
  • CON 3000 Construction Soils
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the nature of soils and how soil materials influence construction operations. Provides a geotechnical overview of soils in construction for the non-engineering major.
  • CON 3001 Building Structures and Structural Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers essential formulae for the solution of structural problems, and the solutions to common structural problems encountered in construction projects. Reviews structural engineering essentials and gives simple design solutions. Includes building and material codes, problems and illustrative examples.
  • CON 3002 Building Mechanical and HVAC Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Provides basic knowledge of building mechanical systems, and methods to estimate, install and verify the systems. Covers basic engineering principles of design associated with mechanical systems. Includes understanding of codes and the principles of design and materials used in the construction of plumbing, HVAC and transportation systems.
  • Technical Elective Credit Hours: 3
Senior Year
Fall (16 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • CON 4000 Construction Controls: Budget, Schedule and Quality
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the fundamentals of construction management. Emphasizes budgeting, scheduling and quality. Focuses on the principles of construction administration. Includes contract types, control of scope, cost, scheduling, quality control and quality assurance, computerized automation and resolution of problems related to construction operations.
  • CON 4001 Building Electrical and Electronic Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Applies the principles of code and the basic concepts in electrical and electronic theory, circuit design, materials, methods, safety and estimating to electrical, communications and power machinery systems. Provides a basic knowledge of systems operations with installation and quality verification methods.
  • CON 4003 Construction Estimating, Bidding and Value Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the basics of construction contracts, construction business methods, bidding, construction insurance and value engineering. Includes principles of cost estimating and value analysis of construction projects, classification of work, quality take-offs, construction operations cost, bidding operations and time value of money.
  • CON 4005 Construction Safety
    Credit Hours: 3
    Provides an understanding of construction safety as federally mandated by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. Includes interpretation and application of regulations, and development of safety plans.
  • CON 4091 Construction Project Proposal
    Credit Hours: 1
    Requires a construction management project proposal in tandem with a civil engineering civil design proposal. Involves teams from both areas developing construction estimates, schedules, field layout, logistics and safety plans required to execute a construction operation.
  • CVE 4000 Engineering Economy and Planning
    Credit Hours: 3
    Presents economic evaluation of engineering alternatives. Includes time value of money, replacement alternatives, benefit/cost analysis, minimum cost analysis, depreciation, taxes and inflation.
    Requirement(s):
    Junior standing
Spring (15 Credit Hours)
Complete:
  • CON 4006 Construction Equipment
    Credit Hours: 3
    Provides the fundamentals of heavy machine use and production estimating for construction operations. Examines major construction machine types and their use. Requires site visits to observe machine operations and includes a term project on planning and estimating equipment usage and operations.
  • CON 4092 Construction Project
    Credit Hours: 3
    Entails development of detailed construction management plans in tandem with civil engineering design projects proposed in . Includes detailed project management plans, budgets, schedules, estimates and related documentation required to complete a full set of construction documents.
  • CVE 4074 Leading Construction Operations
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers specialized application of leadership fundamentals and team building to construction operations. Focuses on the basic principles of leadership including motivation, organizational dynamics, team formation and conflict resolution. Examines construction operations, work practices and ethics in the business environment.
  • Business Elective Credit Hours: 3
  • Technical Elective Credit Hours: 3
Total Credits Required: 127
Electives
Business Electives
  • BUS 3401 Corporate Finance
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys the components of the three basic issues that embody the financial management of a firm: capital budgeting, capital structure and short-term finance and net working capital. Also examines corporate governance, ethics and international issues.
  • BUS 3504 Management Information Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines information systems used in business organizations. Includes discussions of system design, implementation and control of computer-based systems for managerial planning, decision-making and control of an enterprise.
  • BUS 3601 Marketing Principles
    Credit Hours: 3
    Examines the principles of marketing. Emphasizes the marketing concept, functions, consumer behavior, market segmentation, marketing strategy, marketing mixes, market research, marketing legislation and marketing control, as well as providing a foundation for higher-level courses in marketing.
  • BUS 4425 Environmental and Urban Planning
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the concepts and implementation strategies for productive urban and environmental planning.
    Requirement(s):
    Senior standing or prerequisite course
  • BUS 4426 Environmental and Resource Economics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the behavioral sources of environmental problems. Includes property rights, externalities, cost-benefit analysis, depletable and recyclable resources, pollution control, population growth, sustainable development, ecotourism and environmental justice.
  • BUS 4503 Business Ethics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Applies moral reasoning to work-related challenges encountered in modern organizations. Students consider personal values and organizational values in examining organizational culture as a metaphor for the moral environment of organization. Uses cases from business and government to help students practice.
  • BUS 4212 Environmental Auditing Credit Hours: 3
Technical Electives
  • AVM 3201 Aviation Planning
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the student to the requirements, issues and processes involved in aviation planning. Includes in-depth study of the sources of aviation data, forecasting methods, the airport master planning process and environmental issues and requirements.
  • AVT 4301 Aviation Safety
    Credit Hours: 3
    Explores the historical roots of modern safety organizations and the safety responsibilities and operations of the FAA and the NTSB. Closely examines aviation safety planning, icing and human-centered accidents.
    Requirement(s):
    Multiengine Certificate with Instrument Rating
  • CHE 3170 Introduction to Environmental Engineering
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces the field of environmental engineering that emphasizes the interrelationships among air, water and land pollution and the effect of ecological, economic and sociological constraints on the solution of environmental problems.
  • CHE 4284 Industrial Safety
    Credit Hours: 3
    Safety considerations in design and operation of industrial and manufacturing facilities; toxicology, fire and explosion hazards; and OSHA standards.
  • ENS 4010 Geographic Information Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Concepts and applications of geographic information systems (GIS). Presents case studies from environmental and geoscience applications.
  • ENS 4300 Renewable Energy and the Environment
    Credit Hours: 3
    Understanding human energy needs; alternative generating systems; renewable sources including biomass, hydro, ocean current, solar and wind; socioeconomic implications of sustainable energy.
  • ENS 4700 Environmental Hydrology
    (senior standing required)
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers descriptive and quantitative aspects of surface and groundwater hydrology, emphasizing both data interpretation and measurement methodology. Stresses subject areas of particular importance to environmental scientists and meteorologists.
  • ENS 4701 Environmental Regulation and Impact Assessment
    (senior standing required)
    Credit Hours: 3
    Analyzes environmental legislation and the impacts and implications of these regulations on society. Emphasizes environmental impact analysis and environmental impact statement preparation methods.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or senior standing