Masters in Meteorology

8223
Master of Science
Classroom
No
Graduate
Main Campus - Melbourne
Major Code: 8223 Degree Awarded: Master of Science
Age Restriction:  N Admission Status: graduate
Delivery Mode/s: classroom only Location/s: main campus
Admission Materials: 3 letters of recommendation, résumé, objectives, GRE

Program Chair
George A. Maul, Ph.D.

Atmospheric science is focused on understanding Earth's gaseous envelope, predicting its evolution and mitigating human impacts. The M.S. program at Florida Tech is uniquely interdisciplinary, drawing on expertise from the College of Aeronautics, the College of Engineering and the College of Science. As such, the M.S. in meteorology can have special emphasis in areas such as marine meteorology, water resources, atmospheric chemistry, aviation meteorology or remote sensing. Collaborative research is conducted with specialists from the nearby NASA Kennedy Space Center, the USAF 45th Weather Squadron, the NOAA National Weather Service, the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Wind and Hurricane Impacts Research Laboratory (WHIRL) and local government agencies or corporations.

Admission Requirements

A student applying for admission to the graduate meteorology program should have an undergraduate major in the physical sciences or engineering. Preparatory coursework may need to be completed before starting the master of science program, and completion of such courses may require additional time. Any such requirements will be determined by the program chair and graduate faculty before admission. The prospective student will be advised of these requirements before acceptance. Applicants must submit GRE General Test Scores for evaluation.

Degree Requirements

The M.S. degree requires satisfactory completion of 30 credit hours of required and elective courses including thesis, based on an approved plan developed in conjunction with the faculty advisor. A nonthesis option is also available, where in lieu of a thesis the student completes an additional nine credit hours of coursework (for a total of 33 credit hours) and must pass a written master's final program examination. Students with bachelor's degrees in meteorology normally take the core courses plus electives emphasizing their areas of special interest. Students with bachelor's degrees in fields other than meteorology are required to complete the core and other graduate courses in addition to appropriate courses necessary for certification as a professional meteorologist by the American Meteorological Society (see undergraduate curriculum). Students are required to attend the graduate seminar. A student registers for graduate seminar each semester and makes an oral presentation of research results after completing thesis research.

Required Courses
Complete:
  • ENS 5000 Environmental Science Seminar
    (each semester)
    Credit Hours: 0
    Reports and discussions of current research and environmental events by graduate students, faculty and visiting scientists. Required attendance for all graduate students.
  • MET 5001 Principles of Atmospheric Science
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys the atmosphere, atmospheric thermodynamics, extratropical disturbances, cloud physics, storms, radiative transfer, global energy balance, atmospheric dynamics, the general circulation.
  • MET 5233 Atmospheric Remote Sensing
    Credit Hours: 3
    Nature of radiation, blackbody radiation laws, Maxwell's equations, radar equation, radiative transfer equation, inversion techniques. Applications from surface, aircraft and spacecraft observations using Doppler, Lidar, visible, infrared and microwave systems to infer synoptic atmospheric properties.
  • MET 5305 Dynamic Meteorology 1
    Credit Hours: 3
    Dynamics of atmosphere including coordinate systems, balance of forces, derivation of the equations of motion, continuity and energy; barotropic and baroclinic disturbances; geostrophy; and atmospheric transport of energy.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval or prerequisite course
  • MET 5306 Dynamic Meteorology 2
    Credit Hours: 3
    Dynamics of the atmosphere including theorems on circulation and vorticity; scale analysis; friction and turbulence; sound, gravity and Rossby waves; instability; numerical weather prediction.
Electives
Choose from the following:
  • AVS 5201 Aviation Meteorology Theory and Practice
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers selected aviation meteorology topics in depth including stability, causes and manifestations of turbulence and mesoscale convective complexes. Also covers wind shear and microbursts, and their impact on aviation.
  • ENS 4001 The Earth System: Science, Engineering, Management and Education
    Credit Hours: 3
    Includes a series of seminar-style presentations by faculty, invited lecturers and students. Covers holistically understanding Earth as a system and the complexities of interactions between the near-Earth space environment, the solid Earth, the fluid Earth and the living Earth including humankind.
  • ENS 4010 Geographic Information Systems
    Credit Hours: 3
    Concepts and applications of geographic information systems (GIS). Presents case studies from environmental and geoscience applications.
  • ENS 5001 Global Environmental Problems and Solutions
    Credit Hours: 3
    Analyzes global environmental problems including human population growth, climate change, ozone depletion, deforestation and desertification. Students research specific problems and develop potential solutions.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval
  • ENS 5101 Introduction to Air Pollution
    Credit Hours: 3
    Origin, fate, effects and distribution of air pollutants. Includes dispersion modeling, legislation, source control and monitoring.
  • ENS 5700 Introduction to Water Resources
    Credit Hours: 3
    Stresses both descriptive and quantitative surface water and groundwater hydrology, particularly subjects of importance to environmental scientists such as hydrologic budgets, storm water management and groundwater quantity and quality.
  • ENS 5800 Limnology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Chemical, physical and biological dynamics of inland waters.
    Requirement(s):
    Graduate standing in science or engineering
  • MET 4310 Climatology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the distribution of weather elements globally, continental positioning, rain shields, hydrological cycle, meteorological databases, El Nino impacts on humans, global warming and the anthropogenic greenhouse effect.
  • MET 4410 Mesoscale Meteorology
    Credit Hours: 3
    Surveys conceptual models and analyzes techniques for mesoscale phenomena. Includes mesoscale convective complexes, severe storms, atmospheric instability, mesoscale gravity waves, squall lines, drylines, topographic effects, mesoscale clouds and precipitation processes, coastal showers, the sea breeze and other local phenomena.
  • MET 5310 Numerical Weather Prediction
    Credit Hours: 3
    Covers the physical and mathematical basis of numerical weather prediction; numerical methods and computational stabilities; modern operational and research forecast models. Includes a virtual laboratory with applications of simple-to-complex dynamical models and a team project.
  • MET 5320 Global Climate Change
    Credit Hours: 3
    Reviews the present state of climate change science. Addresses proxy reconstruction, uncertainty (feedbacks) and sensitivity, climate modeling, changing sea level and radiative forcing (natural and anthropogenic). Combines background material with relevant peer-reviewed literature. Includes research in an area of interest to the student.
  • OCE 5570 Marine Hydrodynamics and Wave Theory
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the motion of ideal fluid; damping and added mass; wave motions encountered in the ocean; surface gravity waves, internal waves and long waves in a rotating ocean; the motion of viscous fluid; the Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layer; and model testing.
  • OCE 5586 Ocean Engineering Data Analysis
    Credit Hours: 3
    Ocean monitoring requires measurement, analysis and description of processes in random seas. Students produce, from measurements, the statistical distributions of waves, parametric and spectral sea-state descriptions, directional wave spectra, ocean engineering design criteria and linear responses of ocean structures and systems.
    Requirement(s):
    Instructor approval
  • OCN 5001 Principles of Oceanography
    Credit Hours: 3
    A comprehensive survey of the ocean and coastal zone. An integrated study of the relationships and applications of chemical, biological, geological, physical and meteorological sciences to oceanography and ocean engineering.
  • OCN 5210 Marine and Environmental Chemistry
    Credit Hours: 3
    The chemical composition and important reactions along the global water cycle including rain, soil and groundwater, rivers, lakes, estuaries and seawater. Includes weathering, redox processes, carbonate equilibria and nutrients, and lab exercises.
  • OCN 5401 Principles of Physical Oceanography
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces physical oceanography including the properties of seawater, basic concepts of fluid dynamics, heat budget, atmospheric circulation, structure and circulation of the ocean, and tidal and wave motion.
  • OCN 5403 Ocean Wave Theory
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the motion of ideal fluid; damping and added mass; wave motions encountered in the ocean; surface gravity waves, internal waves and long waves in a rotating ocean; the motion of viscous fluid; the Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layer; and model testing.
  • OCN 5405 Dynamic Oceanography
    Credit Hours: 3
    Introduces geophysical fluid dynamics and its application to the study of ocean currents. Includes linear and nonlinear models, vorticity theory and critical discussion of classical papers on ocean circulation.
  • OCN 5407 Marine Meteorology
    Credit Hours: 3
    The application of the basic laws of thermodynamics and geophysical fluid dynamics to the behavior and circulation of the atmosphere-ocean system.
  • OCN 5409 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
    Credit Hours: 3
    Advanced analytical and numerical models of ocean and atmospheric mesoscale, macroscale and global-scale flows with diagnostic and prognostic applications including coupled air/sea circulation physics.
    Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite course or instructor approval
  • OCN 5704 Oceanic Remote Sensing
    Credit Hours: 3
    Radiative processes, remote sensors and sensor platforms; photogrammetry, radiometry and multispectral pattern recognition; image interpretation, data processing and applications. Also includes ocean research examples from aircraft and spacecraft.
  • SPS 4030 Physics of the Atmosphere
    Credit Hours: 3
    Studies the behavior of Earth's lower atmosphere, including an introduction to comparative planetology, atmospheric evolution, thermodynamics, dynamics, waves and turbulence, clouds, hurricanes, global circulation and global change.
  • SPS 5031 Planetary Science 2: Atmospheres
    Credit Hours: 3
    Principles governing the evolution, composition and retention of planetary atmospheres and the interplanetary environment. Includes the neutral atmosphere, photochemical processes, diffusion dynamics and planetary ionospheres and magnetospheres.

Note: Electives listed above are accepted in the M.S. Meteorology degree program, but no more than six credit hours of 4000-level courses from the department (ENS, MET, OCE, OCN) may be used for the master's degree.