Faculty Handbook

 FH 1.5 Standing Committees of the Academic Faculty

Library Committee

The mission of the committee is to communicate with the president and chief operating officer regarding library resources required for undergraduate and graduate student academic success and research as well as faculty teaching and research.

The committee shall be composed of members of the faculty and one member of the student body appointed by the vice president for academic affairs. The faculty members will be nominated by the deans and associate vice presidents to broadly represent the information needs of the on-campus and online undergraduate and graduate students and the teaching and research faculty. The president of the Student Government Association will nominate the student member. Composition of the committee will change in concert with development of the university’s academic and research programs. Membership will include no more than two representatives each from each college. The committee itself elects the chair. A committee member may be appointed to assist the library’s faculty senator(s) in coordinating communication between the committee and the Faculty Senate. The dean of libraries serves as a nonvoting ex officio member of the committee. The library’s directors and information advocates assist and participate in the work of the committee as appropriate.

The duties of the committee shall be:

  1. To represent the interests of the entire university community in assessing library resource requirements to support the academic and research programs.
  2. To inform and advise the chief operating officer on the adequacy and effectiveness of library collections and services.
  3. To communicate committee findings, recommendations and related library information to the faculty and the student body, and to foster and participate actively in dialogs with the academic community concerning information resource options.
  4. To develop faculty and student support for initiatives that align library resources and services with academic and research programs. Examples of these initiatives include the Information Advocates Program, Research and Instruction Program and the Library Information Network (LINK).
  5. To consult with library staff on methods for collecting, analyzing, interpreting and reporting data pertaining to library resource and service effectiveness.
  6. To advise the dean of libraries on strategies to accomplish library goals.
     

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (UGCC)

The UGCC is responsible for recommending the addition or deletion of existing undergraduate curricula and specific changes within the curricula to the vice president for academic affairs. It shall have one voting member from each academic unit that offers undergraduate courses and one voting member from the library faculty. Voting members should have extensive university-level academic experience. The voting member will be elected by the academic unit's faculty and approved by the vice president for academic affairs. The university registrar and academic deans are ex officio, nonvoting members.

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC)

This committee consists of at least four members of the academic faculty appointed by the vice president for research in accordance with the requirements of the National Institutes of Health. The vice president for research appoints the chair from among the faculty and also appoints a fifth member, who has no affiliation with Florida Tech other than by membership on IACUC.

Intellectual Property Committee

This is a universitywide committee having significant faculty representation. The usual membership includes the chief operating officer as chair, the vice president for financial affairs, vice president for research and three faculty.

Graduate Council

See graduate policy "Graduate Council."

Graduate Faculty

See graduate policy "Graduate Faculty."

Ombudsman Committee

Three senior faculty members are appointed by the chief operating officer to serve as an ombudsman committee to hear grievances (other than those associated with termination) that a faculty member does not feel comfortable pursuing through the usual organizational structure, i.e., department head, dean, vice president for academic affairs, chief operating officer or the president. Usually, the faculty member approaches one member of the committee and describes the problem. They then decide whether other members of the committee should be involved and the best approach to resolving the problem.

If resolution of the problem requires disclosure of the member's identity, such disclosure is made only with the approval of the faculty member.

Committee on Faculty Promotions

The committee will offer advice to the vice president for academic affairs on nominees for promotion. The committee is composed of five faculty members from the College of Engineering, four from the College of Science, three from the College of Psychology and Liberal Arts, two from the Nathan M. Bisk College of Business and one from the College of Aeronautics. These numbers represent a percentage of the total number of full-time faculty in each college. If the relative sizes of the colleges change, the representation will change accordingly. Members shall be full professors, except in the case where there are no eligible full professors, when an associate professor may be chosen, or should special circumstances so require. Members serve for three-year terms with no more than two terms in succession. The terms of approximately one-third of the members will expire each year. If a member of the committee is to be considered for promotion, that member must first resign and be replaced by another representative of the academic unit. Guidelines for operation of the committee are given in faculty policy “Procedures for Promotion.” 

University Research Council

The University Research Council is responsible for representing the active research interests of the university, making recommendations to the chief operating officer and communicating to the faculty at large as needed. The council will consist of at least one representative from each college and from the Office of Research. Institutes and centers may send a representative if desired. The chair will be elected by the council and serve a one-year term.

 Institutional Review Board

http://www.fit.edu/research/committees/irb/index.php

Florida Institute of Technology is committed to full compliance with federal rules for the protection of human subjects in research. In accordance with federal regulations (45 CFR 46), all research involving human subjects must be reviewed, or determined exempt, by an institutional review board (IRB), to assure certain protections for human participants.

Any research involving human subjects should be reviewed if it is sponsored by the university, conducted by or under the direction of any university employee in connection with his or her university responsibilities, conducted on or with university property, or involves the use of the university's nonpublic information to identify or contact subjects or prospective subjects. Note that the IRB does not require review of student projects conducted in the context of course work.

The IRB must review and approve human subjects research before any work is started and must review ongoing nonexempt research at least annually.

The IRB must also review all changes to research protocols before implementation (except when necessary to eliminate any immediate hazards to subjects or others).

 

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FH 1.4 Constitution and Bylaws of the Academic Faculty and Faculty Senate

Preamble

No less than its predecessors, the modern institution of higher learning is a guardian and interpreter of intellectual tradition. It is on the competence, integrity and devotion of its faculty to professional ideals that the university must depend for success.

In order for the academic faculty to carry out the ideals and responsibilities set forth above; and

In order for the faculty to more fully and effectively serve the university by participating in the consideration of  academic policies and procedures; and

In order to facilitate participation and provide channels for faculty recommendations and suggestions to the president of the university via the provost, so the president may have advice and assistance from faculty in matters pertaining to the educational interests of the university; and

In order to allow the president via the chief operating officer to assign to faculty problems for investigation and report and to receive from them their recommendations and reports on their initiatives; and

In order to maintain morale and augment understanding and cooperation between the faculty and administration.

The faculty of Florida Tech is organized as the academic faculty; its membership, functions and procedures, being set forth in the following constitution and bylaws:

Article I: The Academic Faculty

Section 1: Membership

The academic faculty of Florida Tech shall consist of the university president, the chief operating officer, vice president for academic affairs, deans, the heads of departments, those members of the faculty holding rank of professor, research professor, university professor, associate professor, associate research professor, assistant professor, assistant research professor, instructor, librarians holding faculty rank, and such other members as may be duly elected provided for in the bylaws.

Section 2: Functions

The functions of the academic faculty shall be to approve candidates for degrees; to refer to the Faculty Senate’s executive committee such matters as may affect the welfare of its members and the academic policies of the university for investigation and action; to receive reports from the Faculty Senate of its actions; and to act on any other matters brought before it by the Faculty Senate.

Section 3: Officers

The officers of the academic faculty shall consist of a chair and a secretary. The vice presdient for academic affairs shall serve as chair, and he shall appoint the secretary and, when necessary, a presiding officer to serve in his/her absence.

Section 4: Meetings

A meeting of the academic faculty shall be held at least once each year, during which meeting the chair of each of the standing committees will deliver their reports. The Faculty Senate may request that the chair call a special meeting of the academic faculty.

Article II: The Faculty Senate

Section 1: Definition

The academic faculty shall elect from among its members an executive committee to be known as the Faculty Senate.

Section 2: Membership

The Faculty Senate shall consist of those members elected by the faculty members of the academic units, as provided for in the bylaws.

Section 3: Functions

The functions of the Faculty Senate shall be to consider policies affecting the academic activities of the university, faculty, welfare, administration, scholarship, awarding of degrees and such other matters as may maintain and promote the best interests of the university. The Faculty Senate shall recommend to the vice president for academic affairs the establishment of new policies or changes to existing policies and report its actions to the academic faculty.

Section 4: Officers

The officers of the Faculty Senate shall consist of a president, a president-elect and a secretary elected by the Faculty Senate from among its members. The election of officers shall be as provided for in the bylaws.

Section 5: Committees

The standing committees of the Faculty Senate shall be:

  • Executive Committee
  • Welfare Committee
  • Scholarship Committee
  • Faculty Excellence Committee
  • Academic Policies Committee
  • Administrative Policies Committee

Special committees of the Faculty Senate may be appointed by the Executive Committee. The composition of the standing and special committees and the duties of the former shall be as provided for in the bylaws.

Section 6: Meetings

The Faculty Senate shall hold one regular meeting each month during the months of September through April at such times as specified in the bylaws.

Special meetings of the Faculty Senate may be called by the presiding officer at any time, including May, June, July and August, provided a majority of the members of the executive committee or their replacements, deem it necessary.

Except for meetings of the executive committee, all meetings of the Faculty Senate shall be open to any member of the faculty. Such visitors may be invited by a member of the executive committee to participate in particular discussions.

Any member of the faculty may present any problem or suggestion to the Faculty Senate for its consideration, provided the member notifies the senate president at least one week before the meeting at which he/she would like to appear.

The Faculty Senate may go into executive session by approval of the members present.

Article III: Rules of Order

www.rulesonline.com/

The faculty may amend the constitution during any regularly scheduled meeting by a two-thirds’ majority vote of the members present. A proposed amendment must be recommended by at least ten members of the faculty, submitted to the Faculty Senate at their next regular meeting, and submitted with the recommendations of the Faculty Senate to the members of the faculty in writing at least ten days before the next meeting at which action on the amendment could then be taken.

An Amendment shall become effective when approved by the Academic Faculty.

Bylaws

Article I: The Academic Faculty

Section 1: Membership

A petition for the election to membership in the academic faculty of any person who is not automatically a member as prescribed in Article I, Section I, of the Constitution, must be submitted to the Faculty Senate and referred by this body, with its recommendation, to the academic faculty for action at the next regular meeting. Election to membership shall be by a simple majority vote of the members present.

Section 2: Quorum

A quorum for any meeting of the academic faculty shall be that number of members deemed necessary by the presiding officer to transact any business.

Article II: The Faculty Senate

Section 1: Membership

The members of the faculty, voting by academic unit for their individual representatives, shall elect members of the Faculty Senate for a three-year term. Each academic unit shall have one member on the Faculty Senate and an additional member for every ten full-time faculty.

The term academic unit throughout this section shall have the following meanings:

  1. In the colleges, a department. For the purpose of senate apportionment, a program outside any department shall be attached to a department within the same college.
  2. Each school as a whole within a college.
  3. The library.

The vice president for academic affairs shall notify the head of each academic unit as to the total number of senate members to which that academic unit is entitled for its first election. This original allocation shall continue for one year. Thereafter, the president of the senate shall obtain the new allocation from the vice president for academic affairs in February of each calendar year. This new allocation shall be given to the head of each academic unit in time for the March election and will control the number elected to the senate at that time. If one member is gained, one shall be elected for three years, and one for two years, etc. If one member is lost in the new allocation, one less member shall be elected to the senate at that election.

Elections shall be held in March of each year, terms of office to begin with adjournment of the April meeting of the senate. The election of members to the senate shall be by secret ballot.

Vacancies created in the senate for any cause shall be filled for the unexpired term by supplementary elections within the academic unit concerned as soon as the vacancy occurs.

Each academic unit is authorized to hold a special election for the purpose of selecting temporary replacements for any senate member who will not be in residence for three or more consecutive months.

Any member of the academic faculty is eligible for membership on the senate.

Section 2: Officers

The officers of the senate shall be elected at the regular meeting held in April of each year.

Elections of officers shall be by a simple majority vote. In the case of the withdrawal of an officer other than the president by resignation or other cause, the senate should elect a successor for the unexpired term at the next regular meeting. In the case of the withdrawal of the president, the president-elect shall serve the president's unexpired term as well as the normal term as their president's successor.

The retiring officers shall serve at the April meeting, and the retiring president shall give the Faculty Senate report at the annual meeting of the academic faculty. The incoming officers shall assume their respective offices on adjournment of the April meeting.

Section 3: Meetings

The Faculty Senate shall hold its first regular monthly meeting on the first Tuesday in September and its regular meetings thereafter at such times as designated by the Executive Committee.

Section 4: Quorum

Fifty-one percent of the elected members of the Faculty Senate shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of all business.

Section 5: Committees

The chair and at least one voting member from each committee of the Faculty Senate shall be members of that body, and all other members shall be from the faculty. The basic function of the committees shall be to investigate and recommend changes in matters pertaining to the academic affairs of the university. They may do this either on their own initiative or on instruction from the Faculty Senate. The faculty, provost or the president of the university may ask through the Faculty Senate that the committee investigate and report on any academic matter. It is not envisioned that these committees shall operate in any administrative capacity; they will report only to the Faculty Senate.

The composition and duties of the standing committees of the Faculty Senate shall be as follows:

  1. The Faculty Senate Executive Committee: The committee shall be composed of the officers and chairs of the standing committees of the Faculty Senate and the immediate past president. The committee shall be chaired by the president of the senate. This committee coordinates the business to come before the senate.
  2. Welfare Committee: The committee shall be concerned with policies that affect faculty welfare and morale. This committee should make recommendations concerning fringe benefits, tuition benefits, equity raises and other related matters.
  3. Scholarship Committee: The committee shall be responsible for the administration and financial aspects of the senate’s scholarship program. The committee shall determine the number of scholarships and the departments to which scholarships will be awarded.
  4. Faculty Excellence Committee: The committee shall be concerned with providing opportunities that emphasize people and activities that significantly contribute to the excellence of the university's distinctive educational programs. Duties include providing recommendations on the use of monies for professional development; recognizing outstanding faculty in the areas of teaching, research and service; coordinating forums for faculty discussion on educational issues; and disseminating information about effective teaching.
  5. Academic Policies Committee: The committee shall be concerned with all policies of an academic nature that pertain to students, including recruitment, entrance requirements, class attendance regulations, student counseling, and placement and academic misconduct.
  6. Administrative Policies Committee: The committee shall be concerned with policies that relate to the employment conditions of the faculty and make recommendations relative to such policies as qualifications for promotion, contract renewals, research, teaching loads, extracurricular assignments, summer employment, absence, sabbatical leaves, travel, dissemination of information to and from the faculty, academic freedom and related policies.

Order of Business

Section 1: The Academic Faculty

  • Call to order, reading and approval of minutes
  • Unfinished business
  • Reports from the Faculty Senate
  • New Business

Section 2: The Faculty Senate

  • Call to order, reading and approval of minutes
  • Reports
  • Unfinished business
  • New Business
  • Discussion and Adjournment
     

Amendment

The academic faculty may amend these bylaws at any of the regularly scheduled meetings by a simple majority vote of the members present. A proposal for amendment must be recommended by at least three members of the faculty, submitted in writing and, with the recommendation of the Faculty Senate, submitted to the members of the academic faculty at least ten days before the next meeting at which time action on the amendment could be taken. An amendment shall become effective when approved by the faculty.

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FH 2.10 Policy on Academic Freedom

The university has endorsed that section of the 1940 statement of the American Association of University Professors that pertains to Academic Freedom as follows:

  1. Teachers are entitled to full freedom in research and in the publication of the results, subject to the adequate performance of their other academic duties; but research for pecuniary return should be based on an understanding with the authorities of the institution.
  2. Teachers are entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing their subject, but they should be careful not to introduce into their teaching controversial matter that has no relation to their subject. Limitations of academic freedom because of religious or other aims of the institution should be clearly stated in writing at the time of the appointment.
  3. College and university teachers are citizens, members of a learned profession, and officers of an educational institution. When they speak or write as citizens, they should be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but their special position in the community imposes special obligations. As scholars and educational officers, they should remember that the public may judge their profession and their institution by their utterances. Hence they should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that they are not speaking for the institution.

 

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New Program Process, Guidelines and Template

This document outlines the process and guidelines for the Florida Tech departments and colleges who wish to introduce new programs (minors and degree and for-credit certificate programs). When colleges are proposing new programs, information is needed by the Office of the Chief Operating Officer (COO) and Executive Vice President, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Academic Program Assessment Committee (APAC), and either the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee or the Graduate Council, as appropriate. This document provides the necessary information to make a decision to approve, disapprove, or ask for modification of the proposal. The information also provides a basis for evaluating an approved program over the next 5–7 years.

I. Proposal

A completed proposal with appropriate departmental and college approval is to be submitted to the COO for review. A completed proposal includes:

  1. A completed New Program Case Statement
  2. A detailed business plan
  3. “Adding a New Major/Minor to the Curriculum” form

New Program Case Statement: Use the template from the New Program Case Statement Template 2013 under the Faculty and Advisor tab at www.fit.edu/registrar/forms.html. It is expected the proposal for a new degree program will address most if not all of the items in the template, while a proposal to create a minor will only require responses to some of the items. If a new minor requires no new resources and no new faculty or courses, most of the sections in the template will not apply.

Detailed Business Plan: As part of the program proposal, a five-year financial model or five-year business plan should be submitted for the proposed program. Provide the following information:

  • Expected student enrollment (full-time and part-time)
  • Tuition (use current tuition) revenues 
  • Additional faculty required
    • Departmental expense (provide salary estimate)
    • Service course faculty (provide salary estimate)
  • Additional support staff
  • GSAs, Adjuncts
  • Summer faculty teaching
  • Fringe benefits
  • Operating expenditures
  • Travel
  • Equipment
  • Library acquisitions
  • Program recruiting

“Adding a New Major/Minor to the Curriculum” form: The form can be found on the Florida Tech website at www.fit.edu/registrar/forms.html under the Faculty and Advisor tab. This form can be used for certificate programs as well. Get necessary signatures before submitting to the COO.

II. Chief Operating Officer Approval Process

The COO will review the proposed program for both its consistency with the Florida Tech mission and its financial viability. If the COO agrees the program is consistent with the mission of Florida Tech and financially viable, the New Program Case Statement will be submitted to the APAC for review and approval of program-level assessment-based materials. The completed proposal will then be submitted to the appropriate university curriculum committee for review.

Before submission to the appropriate curriculum committee, other documents will need to be completed before course/curriculum approval is granted. These are:

  1. “Adding a New Course to the Curriculum” form; one for every new course to be developed and approved
  2. Detailed syllabi for all new courses
  3. Course descriptions for all new courses

“Adding a New Course to the Curriculum” form: Fill out a form for every new course to be developed and approved. Get necessary signatures before submitting to the appropriate curriculum committee. The form can be found on the Florida Tech website at www.fit.edu/registrar/forms.html under the Faculty and Advisor tab. 

Detailed syllabi: Contact the appropriate curriculum committee chair for syllabi requirements.

Course descriptions: Course descriptions for new courses must be pre-edited by the Director of Catalog before being submitted to the appropriate curriculum committee. 

Once the curriculum committee makes a recommendation with appropriate comments, the proposal will be reviewed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and, lastly, by the COO for a final decision.

III. Other Administrative Processes

Once the COO approves the initial New Program Plan, additional administrative processes need to be completed.

Working with Institutional Effectiveness

  • If the new program (whether a full degree program or certificate) is a substantive change (i.e. a significant departure from previously approved programs), the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Accreditation must be contacted in order to report it to our regional accreditor, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).

Working with the Institutional Effectiveness Specialist

  • Submit program name to the Institutional Effectiveness Specialist, who will create an entity for it in WEAVE, the web-based assessment management software.

Once the new program has been approved through the appropriate curriculum committee and has received final approval from the COO, the following administrative processes will need to be completed. Please follow the processes outlined below, as necessary:

Working with the Registrar

  • If the program is a new major or minor, the “Adding a New Major/Minor to the Curriculum” form needs to be completed.
  • If the program is to be offered at sites other than the Melbourne campus, a new program code identifying that campus needs to be assigned to the program.
  • If the program is an existing program offered at a new off-site location, submit to the COO, who will review and either approve or disapprove the program at the new campus.
  • Identify and submit the proposed tuition structure.
  • Identify and submit the academic calendar for the program.
  • Identify and submit all University Catalog changes.

Working with undergraduate and/or graduate admissions

  • Add program to student application.
  • Inquire about advertising and publications for the program.

Working with the bursar’s office

  • Confirm billing times, if different from standard.
  • Confirm payment process, if different from standard.

 

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The Academic Advising Role

Undergraduates have been described by Dr. Thomas H. Peake, School of Psychology, as being in the latter stages of becoming adults. They display, in varying degrees of competence, emotions and independence, a sense of personal identity, relationship skills, purpose and integrity.

The primary purpose of academic advising is to assist students in their pursuit of a college experience to help them fulfill their life goals. Advisers, thus, need to assist students in:

  • clarifying life goals,
  • developing their educational plans,
  • selecting appropriate courses and other educational experiences,
  • using university support services,
  • developing decision-making skills, and
  • developing the capacity to evaluate alternatives and direct their efforts productively.

Some Strategies for Advising

Basic strategies of advisement used to assist in individual student development are emphasized below.

Become acquainted with the advisee in as many aspects as possible

Getting to know the advisee outside the formality of the office can be extremely valuable. Knowing the academic abilities and background of the advisee is also important. Having good documentation (the advising folder) such as high school courses with grades, rank in graduating class, ACT or SAT scores, transfer courses and grades from other universities, and present academic status is essential when assessing a student’s ability and future direction.

Explore the objectives, interests and motivations of the advisee

The advisee’s actual certainty of future objectives and goals is difficult to ascertain. When the advisor has some knowledge of the advisee’s nonacademic background—such as home influence, hobbies and friends—a more thorough type of advisement is possible.

Develop rapport with advisee

If the student knows the advisor as a professional person who has a genuine interest in students, the advisement process becomes much more beneficial for both advisor and advisee.

The student should be encouraged to become acquainted with other faculty members in the academic unit, because multiple contacts can be useful to the student who is attempting to assess his/her personal goals.

Become knowledgeable concerning university rules, policies, regulations and procedures that affect academic programs and activity

Every advisor must be well-informed regarding current academic policies and procedures. Prior review of policies and study of policy changes should be a regular activity of each advisor before beginning each registration period. Familiarity with courses generally taken by advisees, the characteristics of teachers of the courses and how prior students have appraised the courses can make the advisement process smoother and more successful. Suggesting student involvement in campus activities is often the key to retention in school.

Evaluate student motivation

Enhancing a student’s motivation by capitalizing on good academic planning can be a very helpful strategy. Suggested strategies might include:

  1. Matching courses early in the program to the student’s academic strengths, interests and backgrounds.
  2. Helping the student to build on success rather than failure.
  3. Challenging capable students to continue their efforts toward academic excellence.
  4. Explaining the rewards of a strong academic program and associated good grades.

Be aware of the limitations of responsibility as to where the burden of the advisement process falls on the shoulders of the student

Advisers cannot make decisions for an advisee, but they can be a sympathetic listener and offer various alternatives for the advisee’s consideration. Advisers cannot increase the ability of a student, but can encourage the maximum use of that ability. While advisors cannot change some aspects of course schedules or employment loads, the students can be referred to the proper offices for such adjustments.

Seek to determine the level of advisement appropriate for your own comfort and the student’s training

Advisers should not attempt to personally handle complex problems concerning financial aid, mental or physical health, or personal or social counseling. When these situations arise, the faculty advisor should refer students to professional personnel who are specially trained and knowledgeable about dealing with such problems.

Online Degree Evaluation and Advising

The degree evaluation tool, CAPP, lets students and their advisors plan course schedules and view degree evaluations. It can also show what courses would be needed if the student changed major.

The tool analyzes where the student is in terms of their major. It shows what classes have been taken that will be applied to their degree, their program and overall GPA and any classes that have not been used. Advisers can also view the student’s current enrollment and any previous evaluations that have been run, run a new evaluation, and to find out how many course would be needed if the student added a minor.

Detailed instructions and more information about how and when to use the degree evaluation tool may be accessed from the student academics tab in Access Florida Tech under resources.

Some Interview Techniques Used in Advising

Opening: Greet students by name, be relaxed and warm. Open with a question.

Phrasing Questions: Avoid yes/no questions to increase conversational flow.

Listening: Don’t out-talk a student. Listening allows one to identify feelings behind words. Be silent and let the student search for his/her own words or ideas.

Accepting the Student’s Attitudes and Feelings: Convey acceptance in a nonjudgmental way. If the student thinks it’s a problem, so does the advisor. Try to understand where the student is coming from.

Cross-examining: Don’t rapidly fire questions at the student.

Admitting Your Ignorance: Admit when you do not know the answer. Go to your resources for the information or call the student back later when you have the information.

Setting Limits on the Interview: It’s better if the advisor and the student realize from the beginning that the interview will last for a fixed length of time.

Ending the Interview: It’s best to end the interview at the agreed time. Offer to schedule another appointment.

Key Reminders for Effective Advising

  1. Care about advisees as people and keep in frequent contact.
  2. Establish a warm, genuine and open relationship.
  3. Evidence interest, helpful intent and involvement.
  4. Be a good listener.
  5. Establish a rapport with advisees by remembering personal information. Keep a record of past conversations.
  6. Be available, keep office hours and appointments, and seek out advisees in formal settings.
  7. Provide accurate information.
  8. Refer to the current University Catalog, etc.
  9. Know how and when to make referrals, allow the students to do it in your presence and be familiar with referral sources.
  10. Don’t attempt to handle situations for which you are not qualified.
  11. Help students make their own decisions.
  12. Focus on the advisee’s strengths rather than limitations.
  13. Determine reasons for poor academic performance and direct advisees to appropriate support services.
  14. Clearly outline the advisee’s responsibilities and monitor their progress toward educational goals.
  15. Follow up on commitments made to advisees.
  16. Encourage advisees to consider and develop career alternatives when appropriate.
  17. Evaluate the effectiveness of your advising.
  18. Don’t be critical of other faculty or staff to anyone.
  19. Be knowledgeable about career opportunities and the job outlook for various majors.
  20. Don’t betray confidential information.

Advising Undecided Students

Use this plan in a 20-minute advising session or over an extended period of time. A trusting advising relationship needs to be established; the first contact is critical. Remind the students your role is one of support to provide continuity and stability.

Step 1: How undecided is the student?

  • Why are they undecided?
  • What majors are they considering? What majors have they eliminated?
    • (If they can’t answer either question, go through a complete list of the majors offered, giving an explanation of each.)
  • Be sensitive to sex-role stereotyping.
  • Listen for students’ values when identifying alternatives.

Step 2: How should the advisor help students to organize a plan for gathering information?

  • What type of information do they need?
  • Devise a plan for gathering information.
  • Refer to campus resources.
  • Establish a timeline.

Step 3: How should the advisor help the student organize the information gathered?

  • Integrate personal assessment into career choices.
  • Help them understand academic and occupational relationships, including majors that lead to occupational possibilities.
  • Help them understand how majors fit values and goals.
  • Help them narrow their options to two or three.

Step 4: How should advisors support students while they make decisions?

  • Offer feedback on the process.
  • Help identify external factors.
  • Help them understand their decision-making process.
  • Support their decision.

Step 5: How should the advisor help students initiate an action plan?

  • Help identify actions, steps and resources needed to take action.
  • Help set up a realistic timetable for taking action.
  • Remind students that no plan is static; as changes take place, new decisions may need to be made.

Step 6: How does an advisor encourage future contact?

  • Be available to help them to assess further or update their decision.

 

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FH 2.1 Academic Rank

The academic ranks and minimum requirements for each are as follows:

Professor: A doctoral degree or its equivalent with at least five years of successful teaching as an associate professor, and undoubted evidence of scholarly attainments and/or outstanding ability as a teacher.*

Associate Professor: A terminal degree in the faculty member’s field with at least five years of successful teaching as an assistant professor, and some evidence of scholarly attainment and/or superior ability as a teacher.*

Assistant Professor: A terminal or advanced degree in the faculty member’s field with at least five years of college-level teaching or equivalent professional experience.*

Instructor: At least a master’s degree or its equivalent with teaching experience preferred but not required.

Librarian: At least a master's degree in library science with primary duties that do not include teaching.

Adjunct Faculty: Temporary, part-time teaching faculty.

See also faculty policy “Conferring Titles of Emeritus.”

*Note: Professors whose major function is research rather than teaching may have “research” preceding their academic title (i.e., research professor). Professors conferred with endowed chairs may have the endowment name preceding their academic title (i.e., Henry Professor). University Professor is a faculty appointment made by the president and chief operating officer.

To meet the requirements for appointment and promotion, faculty members should have earned degrees from institutions of recognized standing and should hold degrees appropriate for their subject field or work. The faculty member is responsible for furnishing transcripts certifying all degrees. The above rank-by-rank specifications are given only as a guiding policy and are not intended as justification for automatic promotion nor intended to prohibit appointment and/or promotion of rare individuals whose experience and accomplishments outweigh the lack of formal academic training.

The qualities to be recognized through appointments and promotions extend far beyond, and some cases may be independent of, the possession of advanced degrees and years of experience. These important though less tangible factors can be regularly evaluated, but can hardly be meaningfully enumerated on a rank-by-rank statement of policy. Nevertheless, it is not intended in any way to minimize their importance.

 

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Advising International Students

English Proficiency Testing

See academic policy "English Language Proficiency" or "English and Languages" in the university catalog.

Full Time vs. Part Time

Immigration regulations set forth by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) governing the enrollment of international student’s state they must be registered full time. A full-time course of study is defined for the fall and spring semesters as follows:

  • Undergraduate study – a minimum of 12 semester credit hours
  • Graduate study – a minimum of nine semester credit hours

If the summer semester is an international students’ first semester, they are required to be registered full time. Returning international students are not required to be registered in the summer.

No more than one online/distance learning course or three credits per semester may count toward the full-time course load requirement.

International students should maintain full-time student status to avoid problems with the USCIS and/or their own sponsor’s requirements. International students considering a reduction of their course load below that of full-time status should first consult the Office of International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS). If international students are dropping courses that affect their credit-hour total, the signature of the director of ISSS is required. However, if a student is dropping and adding courses for the same amount of credits, no signature is required.

There are certain conditions where an international student may be enrolled less than full time, providing they follow the appropriate authorization procedures. An up-to-date Less Than Full Time Course Load form is available from ISSS. The form must be filled out in its entirety and signed. The exceptions to less than a full load are as follows:

  • English language difficulties (acceptable only in the first semester of enrollment)
  • Unfamiliarity with American teaching methods and requirements (acceptable only in the first semester of enrollment)
  • Improper course-level placement
  • Completion of course requirements (available only in last semester and Petition to Graduate has been filed)
  • Medical (official documentation must be submitted)

Graduate students may register for less than full load if they are registered in a course that the university considers to be full time, for at least three semester credit hours if they have been awarded a full-time GSA, or six semester credit hours if they have been awarded a half GSA.

Note: Financial reasons are never an acceptable reason for a less than full-time course of study.

See academic policy "English Language Proficiency" for information about registration procedures.

Change of Major

Many international students have been permitted to enter the country to study a specific curriculum. When an international student who is being sponsored by an agency or government decides to change his/her major, special permission must be obtained from the student’s sponsor before a change of major can take effect. In addition, changes must be reported to the federal government and documentation updated and processed accordingly. Therefore, ISSS must sign all Change of Major forms for international students.

Dual Major

International students are prevented by USCIS regulations from officially carrying a dual major only if the dual major will adversely affect the forward progress of a student’s course of study and require extensions of his/her program of study. International students can carry a dual major with careful planning and academic guidance.

Time Limits on Academic Programs

There are time limits for completion of degrees by international students. Per USCIS regulations, international students must make “normal progress” in the pursuit of a degree. Extensions of course study may be granted if the student’s advisor makes a recommendation BEFORE their current program end date. The extension process involves the student receiving a letter from their academic advisor clearly stating the reason(s) why an extension is required and the new expected completion date. The student must present this letter to ISSS, along with a new financial statement showing that the student has the resources to continue their studies until the new completion date is reached. Again, AN EXTENSION MUST BE ISSUED BEFORE THE CURRENT PROGRAM END DATE IS REACHED. Failure to do so will result in the student considered to be out-of-status and will be reported as such to immigration.

Academic advisors of international students should also be aware that some sponsors place time restrictions on international students. Advisers are encouraged to contact the ISSS (ext. 8053) whenever they have questions about procedures governing international students.

Recommendation for Less Than Full-Time Load

This form is available from the ISSS office and is provided to facilitate the communication of certain information required by regulations of the USCIS. Its completion is needed for a student in F-1 and J-1 status to be granted permission to carry less than a full-time academic load and still maintain visa status during the academic semester specified on the form.

  1. Permission to take less than a full-time load must be received before dropping any courses. Failure to obtain prior approval will result in the student being considered out-of-status and must be reported to the USCIS.
  2. Documentation is required if dropping a course for medical reasons.
  3. Taking less than a full-time course load can only be used ONCE, unless the student is in their last semester of study. Students should be absolutely certain that they will graduate in the current semester before choosing to register for less than a full-time course load. Failure to graduate after dropping below full time will result in the student being out-of-status and the loss of F-1 benefits.
  4. Permission to take less than a full load is limited only to the choices listed on the form. Dropping a course due to concerns of possible failure in that course is not a legal reason with USCIS.

Students who fall out of status may be eligible for reinstatement with the USCIS, providing they meet eligibility requirements as described in U.S. federal regulations.

Please be aware that applying for reinstatement is not a guarantee that you will be reinstated. for a complete list of full-load courses, contact the Office of Graduate Programs at ext. 8137.

 

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FH 2.3 Basis for Appointment and Promotion

Appointments to the faculty or promotion from one academic rank to another shall be primarily based on education, experience, effective performance and in recognition of special merit in some or all of the activities listed above. The criteria for recognition and evaluation of merit shall become progressively more exacting from lower to higher academic ranks. Promotion to the rank of professor shall be reserved to those members who have demonstrated outstanding performance in their respective fields.

Training and experience are generally recognized in the educational world as basic requirements for appointments and promotions. They are also recognized by Florida Tech, but without the rigidity so often found in automatic promotion plans. Florida Tech subscribes to the belief that alert and progressive faculty members will benefit from their experience, and that graduate study increases knowledge and broadens perspectives. It is definitely expected that each faculty member will endeavor to earn the terminal degree in his/her field.

Under the qualifications indicated above, the university does have a guiding policy on training and experience. It is given here as a general policy to which justified exceptions may be made.

FH 2.4 Procedures for Appointment

Recommendations for appointment should be initiated at the department level. It is suggested that department heads consult with senior members of their respective departments and wherever feasible permit the senior members to meet the prospective appointee. Normally appointments will be the result of a national search, but will always comply with applicable federal and state laws and statutes including recordkeeping to assure compliance with Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) requirements (see faculty policy “Statement of Equal Opportunity”).

Normally, the search for a faculty position is initiated at the department head level with the approval of the dean, vice president for academic affairs and the chief operating officer. An open, nationwide search should be conducted for all academic positions, including advertisement in appropriate publications. The announcement should contain the position description and responsibilities, degrees and experience required, citizenship and application materials (résumés, references and transcripts).

The screening process within the department is as follows. The department head appoints a search committee composed of several faculty members of the department, a chair and an individual responsible for assuring affirmative action compliance. The search committee maintains a log of the applications received. The chair may pre-screen applications for the rest of the committee, removing those candidates who do not satisfy the job criteria. One copy of the application is routed through the search committee members with a request for an evaluation, and comments are to be returned directly to the search committee chair. The search committee convenes when the routing has been completed, at which time each candidate is discussed. Candidates are ranked according to desirability. The search committee chair shall contact the references of the top candidates to verify their experience. The search committee chair shall have a discussion with the candidates starting with the most desirable that will include approximate salary, more detailed teaching and research interests, and availability. If this discussion is satisfactory, the résumé should be submitted to the dean for approval and to arrange an interview trip.

During the on-campus visit, interviews are scheduled with most, if not all, of the academic unit faculty, the academic unit head, heads of the other related academic units and the dean. Usually the candidate presents his/her work at a seminar attended by faculty, graduate students and, frequently, undergraduate students. Whenever possible, the candidate should be scheduled for a short, courtesy visit with the chief operating officer.

After the visit, the search committee chair solicits the evaluation of the academic unit faculty and those outside the unit who interviewed the candidate(s), and calls another meeting of the search committee. Based on the recommendations of the committee, the academic unit head makes the final decision to recommend a candidate, including appropriate salary and rank, to the dean, vice president for academic affairs and the chief operating officer. Official transcripts should accompany the written recommendations. It is the responsibility of the academic unit head to check the validity of the candidate’s academic credentials. Only the chief operating officer may make salary or employment commitments unless specifically delegated to a dean.
 

There are very limited special circumstances in which the full faculty search process may be shortened, e.g. an opportunity arises in which a nationally prominent faculty member becomes available and expresses an interest in Florida Tech. In such a circumstance, the chief operating officer may be solicited for permission to conduct an abbreviated “search.” The process would include a review (including on-campus interview) and recommendation by departmental faculty, endorsement by the dean of the college and submittal through the vice president for academic affairs to the chief operating officer. The chief operating officer would present the findings to the president and, if appropriate, request permission to negotiate directly with the potential faculty member.

 

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FH 2.5 Policy on Periods of Faculty Appointments

Beginning Spring 2009, the periods of faculty appointment at Florida Tech are as follows:

Full professors receive five-year appointments with renewal review during the Spring Semester of the fourth year of the appointment; associate professors, four-year appointments with renewal review during the Spring Semester of the third year; and assistant professors, three-year appointments with the renewal review during the Spring Semester of the second year of the appointment.

A senior member of the faculty is one at the rank of professor, associate professor or assistant professor. He/she becomes “established” when he/she has progressed beyond the first year status, except in unusual cases when he/she is initially appointed as an established member. The chief operating officer must approve these unusual cases.

A new member of the senior faculty, unless initially appointed as established, will be informed before December 15 of their first year on the faculty if their services will not be used in the following academic year. His/her status will be reviewed in the Spring Semester of the first year when their appointments will either be renewed for four years in the case of a full professor and three years in the case of an assistant or associate professor, or they will be re-appointed on first-year status and subsequently treated as one who commences service the following Fall Semester. Professors without previous university faculty experience should expect a second one-year appointment. Reappointment may continue on a first-year status with the approval of the chief operating officer.

Established faculty members who serve as administrators of academic units (department heads, institute directors and directors of off-campus graduate sites of the Extended Studies Division of the Nathan M. Bisk College of Business), will be considered to be serving in the penultimate year of their established period.

Faculty members shall be notified of subsequent year salary and promotion by April 1 of each academic year.

A member of the faculty may obtain a prompt Faculty Senate evaluation of any administrative action taken on his or her appointment status. The senate’s recommendation is submitted to the chief operating officer.

This policy applies only to persons holding faculty rank whose primary duty is teaching. Therefore, those holding academic rank such as the president of the university, the chief operating officer, the vice president for academic affairs, deans, department heads, (except where an established faculty member as noted above), all research professors, librarians and ROTC officers will be automatically excluded.

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FH 2.6 Statement of Equal Opportunity

It is Florida Tech’s policy and practice to prohibit discrimination because of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veteran status or any other discrimination prohibited by law.

The university, as an Equal Opportunity Employer, has adopted standards and practices that insure all applicants for employment and all employees are treated in a fair and impartial manner that recognizes the dignity of each individual and allows selection and advancement based on qualifications and abilities.

If a faculty member feels he/she has been discriminated against regarding access to employment, hiring, promotion, compensation, job assignment or fringe benefits solely because of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, martial status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veteran status or any other discrimination prohibited by law, he/she is entitled to request review by an ad hoc Faculty Senate grievance committee (see policy "Dismissals and Terminations"). See references to the Ombudsman Committee in the policy “Standing Committees of the Academic Faculty.” 

FH 2.6.1 Employment of Persons with Disabilities

Applications of persons with disabilities will be given equal consideration with other applications, and no restrictions will be established to prohibit employment of applicants with disabilities, except where a physician's statement indicates that employment in a particular position would create a potential hazard for the applicant, fellow workers or the university. All efforts will be made to accommodate disabilities on a case-by-case basis in accordance with Americans with Disabilities Act.

 

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FH 2.7 Guidelines for Faculty Promotion

Colleges develop their own promotion guidelines to supplement the general academic rank requirements noted in "Academic Rank" (FH 2.1). At the direction of the vice president for academic affairs, the Committee on Faculty Promotion (CFP) is obliged to apply the promotion guidelines from individual colleges, including a teaching route to promotion, to that college’s promotion candidates. All faculty members at Florida Tech are encouraged to enhance their professional credentials through their own initiatives in acquiring professional growth and development experience.

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FH 2.8 Procedures for Faculty Promotion

Recommendation for promotion should be initiated by the academic unit head, but self-nomination is permitted. The academic unit head should consult with senior members of the academic unit before submitting the recommendation to the vice president for academic affairs. The CFP will provide advice to the vice president for academic affairs on each nominee for promotion. The vice president for academic affairs will obtain the written recommendation from the appropriate dean before submitting a recommendation to the president through the chief operating officer.

All participants in the process except as specified below shall maintain confidentiality.

Guidelines for the contents of the promotion dossier are given in faculty guideline "Promotion Dossier Format." All applicants will follow these guidelines regardless of their home college. Academic unit heads and candidates are advised that the process should begin about one year before the candidate is to be considered for promotion. All completed dossiers, with or without departmental/college endorsement, will be considered by the CFP and forwarded with recommendations to the vice president for academic affairs.

The academic unit head will prepare a dossier containing supporting documents for each nominee of the department. In the event of a self-nomination, the candidate shall prepare the dossier. A written recommendation by the academic unit head shall be included in the dossier before review by the CFP. Dossiers must be delivered to the vice president for academic affairs at least two weeks before the scheduled presentation meeting.

 The CFP is composed as described in faculty policy "Standing Committees of the Academic Faculty." If a member of the committee is to be considered for promotion, that member must first resign and be replaced by another representative of the academic unit.

The vice president for academic affairs will call an organizational meeting of the CFP by the end of January at which time the committee will review each college’s promotion criteria and CFP procedures, and choose a chair to officiate at the annual promotion presentation meeting. If possible the chair will not be from a unit offering a nominee.

All voting members of the CFP will be required to examine all complete candidate dossiers (with or without academic unit endorsements) and apply each college’s promotion guidelines during a two-week review period at a location prescribed by the vice president for academic affairs. Usually the review period will be the last week of February and the first week of March.

The promotion presentation meeting shall take place no later than March 15. In addition to the members of the CFP, attendance at the promotion presentation meeting will normally include the vice president for academic affairs and/or his representative, deans and heads of the candidates’ academic units. At the promotion presentation meeting, each candidate’s case is briefly presented by his/her academic unit head in the context of the college’s promotion guidelines. The committee will engage in a thorough discussion of the candidate's qualifications as they relate to the college’s promotion guidelines. The candidate’s academic unit head will participate fully in the discussion and, if a member of the CFP, vote with the full committee. A self-nominated candidate will generally select a member of the CFP to present their case, but has the right to present their own case. At the time of dossier submission, a self-nominated candidate must inform the vice president for academic affairs who will be making the presentation.

Ballots will be prepared and provided by the vice president for academic affairs. The ballot will consist of a cover page with each candidate’s name and a space for a yes, no or abstain vote. A separate sheet will be attached for each candidate and the committee member will make comments on each candidate for subsequent use by the vice president for academic affairs and feedback to the candidates. Negative votes must have written justification. The vice president for academic affairs will collect the ballots after all candidates have been considered. The results will be tabulated at the meeting and made known to the members of the CFP. As stated earlier, the results are considered as advice to the provost and are to be treated with utmost confidentiality.

Candidates will be notified of the final promotion decision by March 25. Usually the academic unit head will notify the candidate in person. A typed compilation of the committee’s anonymous comments will be made available to the candidate on request. Unsuccessful candidates will be encouraged to consult with their dean and the vice president for academic affairs for clarification of the decision.

The vice president for academic affairs will notify all members of the CFP by April 1of the final decision of the university either by letter or in a meeting of the committee.

 

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FH 2.9 Dismissal and Termination

FH 2.9.1 Termination by the University

The university reserves the right to prematurely terminate any faculty member for any of the following reasons: incompetence, neglect of duty, insubordination, moral turpitude or financial necessity on the part of the university as a whole.

Incompetence

Incompetence occurs if a lack of ability renders the faculty member unable or unwilling to effectively perform teaching or other duties assigned by the university. The incompetence must be of a sufficient degree that remediation is unlikely within a reasonable period of time or the faculty member’s attitude is such that he/she is unwilling or unable to make necessary changes. The university need not continue a faculty member whose methods are ineffective or whose attitude is improper, if his/her retention will directly harm students or otherwise impair the university’s pursuit of its educational mission.

Neglect of Duty

Neglect of duty is the failure to meet a specific duty related to the express and implied obligations of a faculty member under the contract of employment, which may extend beyond teaching to requirements related to service and research.

Some of the enforceable duties at the university are for reporting, committee work, maintenance of office hours and other obligations of the employment relationship, such as best effort concerning research contract deliverables.

Insubordination

Insubordination generally means a willful disregard of reasonable directives or a defiant attitude of noncompliance toward regulations specifically applicable to the faculty member.

Dismissal on grounds of insubordination would be warranted for willful failure to follow directives that are reasonable and rationally related to the university’s educational objectives. To justify dismissal, disobeying a directive must be shown to adversely impact the pursuit of educational goals or mission of the university.

Moral Turpitude

Moral turpitude occurs when the individual’s private conduct adversely reflects on his/her ability to perform without harming the university’s educational process. In accordance with the statement on academic freedom, a faculty member’s opinions, personal moral code or religious belief shall not be used as criteria for appointment, promotion or dismissal. A faculty member's public actions may, however, be so used. Moral turpitude includes, but is not limited to, fraud in securing employment, dishonesty, drunkenness during working hours, conviction of a felony or misuse of university property or funds.

Anyone dismissed for moral turpitude need not be given prior notice and automatically forfeits all rights to benefits that would have otherwise accrued to him/her, excepting such benefits that have been paid through payroll deductions.

Financial Necessity

In the case of financial necessity, notice must be made by December 15 of the academic year before the year of the faculty member’s dismissal. A faculty member will not be terminated because of declining departmental enrollment or shifting departmental emphasis during the time his/her appointment is in effect. Termination for financial necessity requires a written statement to that effect by the chief operating officer with endorsement by the senior vice president for finance and the president.

FH 2.9.2 Appeal

A faculty member terminated for any reason may obtain a prompt evaluation of such administrative action by a Faculty Senate grievance committee on written request to the president of the Faculty Senate.

Faculty Senate Grievance Committee

On being presented with a bona fide grievance from a member of the faculty of Florida Tech, the president of the Faculty Senate shall choose a committee of four senators to serve as a Faculty Senate grievance committee, so that fair and impartial consideration will be given to the grievance. If adequate balance to the committee composition cannot be obtained from members of the senate, the president may appoint non-senators. The senate president is at liberty to designate a fifth member as committee chair or may serve in that capacity him/herself, so long as there is a chair and four committee members.

In separate sessions, the committee shall interview all parties to the grievance and consider all materials submitted. In addition, the committee shall request and examine further materials it deems relevant and investigate the legitimacy of “standards” claimed by either party. These tasks identified by the committee are to be assigned by the committee chair.

The committee shall meet a minimum of three times or as often as the committee chair sees fit during the consideration of the grievance. These must include an initial, organizational meeting, an interim or progress report meeting and a concluding meeting at which a vote shall be taken. Before the vote at the concluding meeting, the parties’ positions will be thoroughly discussed. The committee chair shall vote with the committee members. The outcome of the vote, which shall be considered the decision of the committee, is to be reported at the next meeting of the senate executive committee. The decision of the committee shall be reported to both parties to the grievance and to the vice president for academic affairs.

Either party may petition the executive committee to re-open the investigation by reconvening the committee only if the party presents new and compelling evidence pertaining to the grievance.

FH 2.9.3 Termination by a Faculty Member

If a member of the faculty desires to terminate an existing appointment or to decline renewal in the absence of notice of nonrenewal, they shall give notice not less than three months before the end of his/her duties during an academic year exclusive of a summer session if their rank is instructor or assistant professor, and not less than four months if their rank is higher. They may request a waiver of this requirement in the case of hardship or in a situation where they would otherwise be denied substantial professional advancement. Where the faculty member declines to accept the offered annual contract letter before the renewal date, usually May 1, the waiver is automatic.

 

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FH 2.12 Sabbatical Leave

Florida Tech recognizes the necessity for faculty members to acquire new and enriching experiences and to secure uninterrupted time for research, and thereby encourages and supports the sabbatical leave concept.

Eligibility

A faculty member whose service to Florida Tech for three or more continuous academic years meritoriously warrants sabbatical leave, may be granted leave of absence with part-time pay for a period not exceeding one year. Leave may be granted for the purpose of pursuing advanced study beyond the terminal degree, engaging in research or traveling in support of scholarly pursuits; in general, any activity that will enhance the professional and scholarly growth of the applicant. Sabbatical leave will not be granted more than once every seven years. The deadline for request is November 1 for a leave beginning the following academic year with a decision on the request by January 15. Applications for sabbatical leave must be made in consultation with the faculty member’s supervisor and dean, and forwarded through the vice president for academic affairs to the chief operating officer.

The sabbatical application should consist of a letter that states the date of the last sabbatical taken by the applicant, the time frame proposed for the requested sabbatical, a brief description of the activities planned during the sabbatical, and a description of the benefits of the sabbatical in terms of scholarly growth for the applicant and benefit to the university. Detailed proposals may be submitted as attachments.

If the sabbatical is approved, the precise terms of the leave of absence shall be in writing and given to the faculty member at the time of approval of the sabbatical leave.

Compensation

Sabbatical leave may be granted by the university for one academic term with full pay, or for one academic year with half pay. The amount paid shall not exceed half of the faculty member’s regular salary for the academic year during which the leave takes place. Consultation between the faculty member and the chief operating officer will determine the applicable compensation option.

It is expected that a faculty member on sabbatical will not engage in remunerative employment. However, approval may be given if compensation for such employment amounts to not more than a half-year's salary plus $5,000 for those on leave on half pay for a full year. This makes it possible for a faculty member to enjoy the salary equivalent to that of the university plus $2,500 per term in consideration of the special expenses to the faculty member. Beyond such amounts of earning, the obligation of the university to the faculty member on leave will be proportionately reduced. However, foundation grants for research material or special travel will not reduce the obligation of the university, and in special cases, the common-sense principle may be applied. The aim of the leave of absence and any obligation of the university do not extend beyond this point. In cases of outside remuneration beyond the points mentioned above, the faculty member may be granted leave at his own expense, or the university may be relieved of its obligation in proportion to the earnings involved.

Conditions

A faculty member is given sabbatical leave with the expectation that she/he will return to full-time service with the university at the conclusion of the sabbatical. A condition of accepting the sabbatical is that the faculty member must execute a formal contractual agreement that specifies the obligations of the university and the faculty member. Faculty not returning incur a financial obligation: The faculty member will, to the extent permitted by law, pay back funds received from Florida Tech during the sabbatical if the faculty member does not resume full-time employment with Florida Tech for at least one academic year after the sabbatical. Interest at the rate of 1.3 times prime will accrue on the sabbatical leave amount beginning with the end date of the sabbatical. Lump sum payback is expected. If not lump sum, the rate of payback will be determined by Florida Tech but will not exceed one year.

 

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FH 2.17 Pursuit of Academic Degrees by Faculty

Florida Tech faculty of professorial rank of assistant professor or higher are not allowed to pursue Florida Tech academic degrees. Only the chief operating officer may grant an exception/exemption to this policy.

 

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FH 2.18 Policy on Faculty Advising

See also faculty guideline "Faculty Advising" for guidelines and procedures for successful advising.

Every student at the university is assigned a full-time faculty member as his or her faculty advisor. Faculty advisors should instill in their advisees a confidence that the academic, professional and social development of the student is their serious concern. They should advise students concerning their courses of study after making a thorough examination of the student’s past academic performance, not only at Florida Tech, but also at any other school the student has attended. They assist students in career development and advise on course selection during registration. Faculty advising is one of the most important responsibilities of a faculty member outside the classroom.

Faculty should be familiar with policies covering confidentiality of student records and cheating/plagiarism, covered in the following two sections.

See also policy on FERPA, and the student handbook policy "Cheating and Plagiarism."

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FH 2.2 Policy on Conferring Titles of Emeritus

In recognition of faithful service, the title of Emeritus will be conferred on professors, associate professors and assistant professors who have a minimum of fifteen years’ academic service, with at least ten at Florida Tech, at the time of their retirement from the university.

There shall be no distinction between retiring for age, length of service or disability, as long as the required minimum length of service is met.

 

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FH 2.22 Policy on Objectivity in Research

Objectivity is one of the cornerstones of the research enterprise. To ensure the university fulfills its role as careful steward of the public and private research resources entrusted to it, the university is in the process of developing a set of explicit policies and procedures for disclosing, reviewing and managing conflicts that may naturally arise in the course of carrying out the university’s mission goals in research and technology transfer. These policies and procedures are outlined in faculty policy  “Policies and Procedures to Ensure Objectivity in Research.” Copies of the document are available from the Office of the Vice President for Research.

 

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FH 2.20.1 Policy on Research Proposals

The principal investigator is responsible for the scientific merit of a proposal. Adequate care must be taken to explain and document the proposed research topic. Proper consideration must be given to the procedure for carrying out the proposed investigation including the amount of time required and the total cost of the work. The principal investigator is also responsible for defending the proposal and must take into account that a proposal submitted to a funding agency reflects on the academic and research stature of the university.

The principal investigator should contact the Office of Sponsored Programs for current fringe benefits and indirect cost rates before preparing the budget. An internal budget form must also be completed. Approval by the principal investigator, academic unit head, dean and vice president for research confirms and commits Florida Tech to the staffing requirements and support facilities, and any Florida Tech matching contributions, which are not necessarily a part of the budget submitted to the sponsoring agency.

 

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FH 2.20.3 Responsibilities in Academic Research

The university and the sponsor recognize specific responsibilities in the performance of the proposed work once a research contract or grant has been awarded. The most important of these lies with the principal investigator and the academic unit head, as indicated in faculty policies "Research Duties and Responsibilities of the Principal Investigator," "Research Duties and Responsibilities of the Academic Unit Head" and "Research Duties and Responsibilities of Approval of the Senior Administrative Officers."

 

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FH 2.20.4 Research Duties and Responsibilities of the Principal Invesitgator

Principal investigators are responsible for the overall direction and management of their research programs. In this capacity, they have the authority to direct graduate students supported on their project, as well as that portion of other institution personnel whose time has been specifically budgeted to the program. The principal investigators monitor all expenditures on their grants or contracts, and are fully authorized to approve purchase orders that apply solely to their grants or contracts. Federal funding agencies generally regard the principal investigator as the primary individual to consult on all matters relating to carrying out the research objectives, keeping all expenditures within the research budget as negotiated and signed, and meeting the prescribed deadlines for filing administrative and technical research reports and project results.

 

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FH 2.20.5 Research Duties and Responsibilities of the Academic Unit Head

The approval of the academic unit head on the official copy of the research proposal means explicitly that the academic unit head:

  1. Approves the work proposed by the principal investigator.
  2. Considers the proposal to be a scholarly inquiry that reflects positively on the principal investigator and the university.
  3. Assures the prospective sponsor that, if the proposal receives favorable consideration, the principal investigator and all other individuals listed in the proposal will be released from academic and administrative responsibilities for the amount of time indicated in the proposal.
  4. Assures the prospective sponsor that if the proposal receives favorable consideration he/she will render all administrative assistance required by the principal investigator to meet the prescribed program objectives within the specified time span. 

 

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FH 2.20.6 Research Duties and Responsibilities of Approval of the Senior Administrative Officers

The approval of the senior administrative officers on the official copy of the research proposal means explicitly that:

  1. The research budget calculations have been verified by the Office of Sponsored Programs of the university, working with the principal investigator and other university personnel.
  2. The senior administrative officers concur with the decisions reached by the academic unit head concerning the caliber of the proposal and its relevance to planned and projected activities in the department.
  3. The senior administrative officers provide assurance to the prospective sponsor that, if the proposal receives favorable consideration, these officers will render all administrative assistance required by the academic unit head and the principal investigator in order to meet the program objectives within the specified time span.

 

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FH 2.20.7 Policy on Research Misconduct and Fraud

Fortunately, research misconduct and fraud are rare events. However, because of the seriousness of misconduct and the special responsibilities of universities in such circumstances and in accordance with federal regulations, the university has developed a set of explicit policies and procedures for dealing with allegations of research misconduct and fraud. These are outlined in the “Administrative Policy and Procedures for Review, Investigation and Reporting Allegations of Research Misconduct and Fraud.” This document is an appendix of the Research Handbook. Copies of this document are available from the Office of the Vice President for Research.

 

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Undergraduate Course Syllabi and Textbooks

For each undergraduate course, the instructor should select a textbook and prepare a syllabus. The syllabus will be given to the student at the first meeting of the course. The instructor should, at a minimum, cover all the material listed in the syllabus and use the selected textbook for out-of-class reading. If the instructor cannot adhere to this policy, he/she should report the expected deviations to the academic unit head/program chair immediately. Uniformity, particularly in undergraduate prerequisite courses, helps preserve continuity.

The syllabus should contain:

  • Course number (including section number if multi-section course), name and semester
  • Instructor’s name and official location, e-mail address (phone ext.)
  • Textbook(s) and author(s) name, and edition, if applicable
  • A week-by-week list of subject matter to be covered in the course
  • Explanation of any term papers, projects or other requirements
  • Grading procedures

All syllabi must include the attendance policy. Although there is no universitywide policy regarding penalties for non-attendance, students are expected to attend all classes.

All syllabi should contain a statement on academic honesty.

Copies of all syllabi and handouts must be on file in each academic unit office.

 

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Advising Students for Directed Study

When a student, for reasons beyond his/her control, must earn credit for a particular course before the next time at which the course will be offered, it is occasionally possible to arrange for personal study of the subject as directed by a qualified full-time faculty member. (see academic policy "Directed Study")

To enroll for a directed study course, the student should initiate a Request for Directed Study form and obtain the needed approvals as directed on the form. Approval is given at the discretion of the academic unit offering the course.

Normally, evidence of a compelling need (e.g., course required for graduating before course’s next scheduled offering) and due diligence by the student regarding taking the course when offered are required for approval. Not taking the course at its last scheduled offering because of an unpopular class time or instructor is never an acceptable justification. 

 

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Advising to Improve Grades

Frst-year students are contacted by their advisors and notified of their current academic situation if their grades need improving. Any student deficient in one or more courses should be informed so changes can be made.

During the eighth week of each term, instructors of 1000- and 2000-level courses enter all midterm grades (A.B.C.D.F or I) online. During the ninth week, students are alerted and are encouraged to visit their faculty advisor, who also has been alerted.

The advisor should review the student’s folder before an advising meeting. Each folder should contain placement test scores, course placements and test descriptions, high school and previous college transcripts (or an abstract of relevant information), correspondence, previous grade reports and the student’s current schedule.

During the advising session, the advisor should:

  • Review the student’s academic progress. If she/he has a D or F, the options include prompt consultation with pertinent instructor(s), dropping a course before the ninth week, and/or seeking tutoring through the Academic Support Center.
  • Review curriculum requirements and weigh the workload vs. demonstrated capacities.
  • Review the academic regulations with the student, including necessary prerequisites.
  • Review the Student/Faculty Complaint Procedure, if appropriate.
  • Inform the student about personal counseling and academic counseling available at CAPS and the Academic Support Center.
  • Be alert to other contributing factors such as study habits, time management, memory development, personal relationships with peers and/or instructors, knowledge of resources, health, test preparations, money management or other sources of stress. The Academic Support Center can assist in these areas.

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Online Degree Evaluation and Advising

The degree evaluation tool in Banner (CAPP), accessed from the PAWS home page (www.fit.edu/paws) by logging in with TRACKS information, lets students and their advisors plan course schedules and view degree evaluations. It can also show what courses would be needed if the student changed major.

The tool analyzes where the student is in terms of their major. It shows what classes have been taken that will be applied to their degree, their program and overall GPA and any classes that have not been used. Advisers can also view the student’s current enrollment and any previous evaluations that have been run, run a new evaluation, and to find out how many course would be needed if the student added a minor.

Detailed instructions and more information about how and when to use the degree evaluation tool may be accessed from the Office of the Registrar home page (www.fit.edu/registrar) by clicking on “Degree Evaluation Instructions/Faculty” in the Fast Access box, or by clicking on Degree Evaluation (CAPP) under “Web for Faculty” on the PAWS home page (www.fit.edu/paws).

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FH Appendix 2: Promotion Guidelines: College of Engineering

Revised by the College of Engineering College Council and approved by the College of Engineering Faculty, April 30, 2009

Preface

The College of Engineering (COE) Council reviewed current COE Faculty Promotion Guidelines and presented suggested revisions to the COE faculty for approval. These guidelines are used by the COE to evaluate faculty for promotion. The dean, with advice from the Faculty Development Committee (FDC) will review and comment on submitted faculty dossiers, relative to faculty promotability. With advice from the FDC, the dean will suggest to faculty areas of improvement in the event that it is assessed they do not meet the criteria for promotion. Documents in support of promotion should be submitted to the dean by November 20.

The criteria address the need for and importance of scholarly contributions including excellence in teaching, research and service. Significant weight is placed on such activities as publishing in refereed publications and book projects, competing for and receiving contract and grant support, demonstrated excellence in the classroom and teaching laboratories, student production, contributions to one’s profession on national and international levels, and awards and special citations received. The candidate’s sustained accomplishments at Florida Tech will be weighted more heavily in this process than previous career achievements.

College of Engineering Promotion Guidelines

The following paragraphs provide guidelines for COE recommendation for promotion to associate and full professor at Florida Tech. COE recommendation for promotion to the rank of associate professor will be based on successful completion of enough of the goals outlined here to suggest the candidate is at least halfway along the path to full professorship. Special cases for associate professor may also be considered under exceptional circumstances. Furthermore, these guidelines serve to introduce a new assistant professor to the goals and tasks required for a successful career path in academia.

These guidelines should be used by a potential candidate to decide whether or not the candidate should be presented to the university for promotion. Promotion need not be contingent on successful completion of all components stated herein. A typical candidate, however, would have few exceptions and would be well above the minimum requirements in a number of areas. True excellence in one of the three broad categories described below will also be viewed favorably with sufficient achievement in the other areas. A candidate may be considered for promotion to associate professor after a minimum of five years as an assistant professor or equivalent. Similarly, a candidate may be considered for promotion to professor after a minimum of five years as an associate professor. There is no maximum time limit. In some cases, associate professor may be the terminal rank.

The areas for evaluation are consistent with those specified in a memo of November 2, 1998, from the associate provost and include "Teaching and Related Activities," "Research and Scholarly Activities" and "Service Activities." Scholarly activities and research have traditionally been the primary focus for promotion at U.S. universities; however, outstanding performance in the teaching and service areas are also important in the present climate of higher education in America and will be given appropriate recognition.

Teaching and Related Activities

The candidate for promotion will have a record of performance that includes many of the activities specified below:

  1. A consistent record of teaching excellence, versatility and student production at either or both the undergraduate and graduate levels.
  2. Published or made significant contributions to a textbook in the candidate’s field.
  3. Served as the major advisor for M.S. or Ph.D. graduates in programs offering the Ph.D.
  4. Served as faculty representative (advisor) to student clubs, societies or organizations.
  5. Served on M.S. and Ph.D. committees in own or for other academic departments.
  6. Been an active member of regional and/or national educational societies/organizations.
  7. Introduced new courses into the curriculum, developed new academic programs or made significant modifications to an existing academic program at the undergraduate and/or graduate level.
  8. Received funding from outside agencies or foundations for curriculum development and revisions, enhancing teaching laboratories, etc.
  9. Developed and introduced innovative pedagogical techniques that may include the incorporation of technology into the curriculum.
  10. Generation of significant number of student awards at the regional, state or national level under candidate’s direction.

Scholarly Activities and Research

The candidate for promotion will have a record of performance that includes many of the activities specified below:

  1. A consistent record in peer-refereed publications during the years preceding promotion. In cases of joint authorship, i.e., with other colleagues, indicate nature and extent of candidate’s contribution for each such publication.
  2. Published or made significant contributions to a scholarly book or textbook.
  3. Served on the editorial board of a recognized journal.
  4. Served as reviewer of journal articles, research proposals of federal agencies and/or research-level books or monographs.
  5. Served on national committees that relate to support of research, e.g., review boards, national societies.
  6. Served as chair or as part of the organizing committee for national or international science/engineering society meetings.
  7. Developed a list of citations of the candidate’s research papers published by other researchers in the field.
  8. Given presentations pertaining to pedagogy or research at regional, national and international meetings of professional societies, including invited lectures/presentations.
  9. Received grant and/or contract support for research and scholarly activities from federal, state or industry sources with some regularity.
  10. Received recognition for research and scholarly activities from regional, national and/or international organizations.
  11. Contributed to advancement of the candidate’s discipline through research activities. This may be in the form of a patent, invention, design methodology, pedagogy, analysis, math model, computer software, etc.

Service Activities

The candidate for promotion will have a record of performance that includes many of the activities specified below:

Service to University

  1. Participated on departmental, college and universitywide committees.
  2. Assumed an active role as an officer in the Faculty Senate at Florida Tech.
  3. Assumed administrative functions within the department.
  4. Represented the university in regional, national or international organizations (committees) related to university affairs.
  5. Served on a national review or accreditation committee.
  6. Contributed to university-sponsored programs, short courses, etc., for prospective university students.
  7. Contributed to university-related outreach projects.

Service to Profession

  1. Served as the external member on M.S. and/or Ph.D. committees at another university.
  2. Served as an officer of, or received recognition by, a professional, engineering or scientific society at the local, regional, national and/or international level.
  3. Acted as a consultant in his/her area of technical expertise for industry, other universities or national laboratories.
  4. Organized/taught short courses or seminars on special topics in science or engineering for the scientific/engineering community.
  5. Evaluated textbooks or ancillaries to textbooks.
  6. Achieved professional recognition in the form of registration, if applicable to field.
  7. Participation in the authorship or evaluation of national or state exams.

Amendments or modifications, to the “College of Engineering Promotion Guidelines” require a two-thirds vote of COE Faculty voting, with a quorum being present.

Edward H. Kalajian, Ph.D.
Chair, College of Engineering College Council
Associate Dean, College of Engineering

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FH Appendix 3: Promotion Guidelines: College of Science

College of Science and Liberal Arts Memorandum updated: October 1996

TO: Faculty - College of Science and Liberal Arts
FROM: Gordon L. Nelson
SUBJECT: Promotion Guidelines
Note: edited by Chief Operating Officer (formerly titled 'Provost') for title updates: 7/4/11
Note: edited by Provost for currency: 3/31/05

Faculty have frequently asked for guidance as to what is expected related to promotion. A dean’s advisory committee has been constituted and guidelines drafted. The guidelines have been reviewed by department heads and comments received from the vice president for academic affairs. The guidelines are issued as a help and as a guide. They are based on collective effort. Comments are appreciated. These guidelines will be operative in the next promotion cycle. Potential candidates meeting these guidelines are urged to discuss their personal situations with their respective department heads.

These guidelines provide the faculty and departmental administrators with a basis for judgment in evaluating and in rewarding meritorious performance at the university.

The document also indicates to the faculty the range and quality of academic effort which will optimally benefit their careers and meet the goals of the department and university.

Promotion Procedures

  1. Collection of documentation for the promotion dossier is the responsibility of the candidate requesting promotion. The dossier must follow the same organization and use the same headings and subheadings which are listed in "Promotion Dossier Format" (Appendix I). Either the department head or the faculty member may initiate the promotion procedure, but all documentation must go through the department head whether he/she supports the request or not.
  2. This documentation is presented to and is evaluated by the department head. In case of promotion from associate to full professor, additional external evaluations will be solicited from professionals familiar with the work of the candidate. Names of external reviewers may be provided by the candidate and/or the department head. Those names may include reviewers who know the candidate personally and those who know of the candidate only through his/her research and publications. Limited use should be made of close colleagues and mentors.
  3. The department head makes the recommendation by letter and forwards all documentation to the "College Promotion Committee" for evaluation. The department head recommendation should list, explain, and interpret the quality of all accomplishments of the candidate for the committee. The recommendation for promotion must be justified by the department head.
  4. The College Promotion Committee (hereafter referred to as the committee) is a three-person committee appointed by the dean of the college and is composed of full professors who may be department heads. The department head may designate a representative, approved by the dean, if a conflict of interest exists. The function of the committee is to advise the dean of the college on matters of faculty promotion.
  5. Based on the committee’s evaluation, a recommendation is made by letter to the dean of the college. The committee also forwards the candidate’s complete promotion dossier and the department head’s recommendation letter to the dean.
  6. The dean may interview the faculty member under consideration for promotion, the department head and/or the committee if additional information is required or if the dean has a question.
  7. Recommendations by the: (1) dean; (2) College Promotion Committee; and (3) department head are forwarded to the vice president for academic affairs by the dean for final evaluation.
  8. Pre-application
    • Since preparing a promotion package is a time consuming process, the committee encourages the department head to submit a pre-application. This would include the résumé of the candidate and a cover letter. The cover letter should state why the person should be considered for promotion. This letter is particularly important if there is anything unique about the candidate’s eligibility for promotion. The pre-application step is not a requirement for promotion. It is only a way to let the department head know if his or her thinking is in line with that of the committee. 

Promotion Eligibility

Assistant Professor

Appointment as an assistant professor shall be based on a candidate’s potential to teach effectively and to conduct meaningful research. Potential will typically be determined through the examination of an academic vitae, letters of recommendation and the presentation of an invited interview and seminar. Appointment will be considered only for the holder of the terminal degree.

Associate Professor

  1. Promotion of candidates to associate professor is not automatic, but based on the fulfillment of potential in research and teaching. Professional service and active participation in departmental and university affairs will also be considered. Such participation, however, is less significant than either teaching or research.
  2. Teaching performance of high quality will be expected of all faculty. and such performance shall be judged on the basis of peer, ex-student and student evaluation. The candidate must demonstrate the ability to present relevant and current information and ideas in a manner that promotes learning.
  3. Research qualifications shall be judged on the basis of an active and meaningful research program. Evidence of activity shall be based on the established criteria (see section on criteria below). Evidence of research quality shall be based on a thorough review of the candidate’s research program by the committee.
  4. Qualifications in professional and university service shall be based on letters obtained from committee chairs and fellow committee members. Performance in such service must be distinguished to be considered meritorious.
  5. A candidate may be considered for promotion to associate professor after a minimum of five years as an assistant professor or equivalent. It is generally expected that an assistant professor will make significant progress toward promotion to receive contract renewal.

Professor

  1. Promotion to professor shall be based on the establishment of a university and a national reputation for scholarship.
  2. Criteria for promotion to professor shall be the same as those for promotion to associate professor. However, the level of attainment within these criteria will be higher for promotion to professor, and letters shall be solicited from at least five renowned scholars in the candidate’s research specialty.
  3. A candidate may be considered for promotion to professor after a minimum of five years as an associate professor. There is no maximum time limit. The associate professor rank may be the appropriate terminal rank in some cases.

Promotion Criteria

  1. The three areas in which a candidate will be evaluated for promotion are the following: "Teaching," "Research" and "Service."
  2. These criteria, provided to advise the department head and his/her faculty regarding their promotion plans, will be used by the committee in making a promotion recommendation to the dean. A key point is that the following criteria are meant to be viewed only as a minimum to be considered for promotion. This does not mean that if faculty meet all the criteria they will be promoted. It means only that if they do not meet the criteria, they will not be considered for promotion. The criteria are for the department head’s use in advising only, not as a checklist to be completed for promotion. To be successful in a bid for promotion, candidates must demonstrate that they exceed the criteria in the three areas.

Promotion to Associate Professor

  1. Teaching: Each of the following per year during the previous five years:
    •  at least two courses with "good" reviews; none with "bad" reviews.
    •  at least one of the following (where applicable):
      • serve satisfactorily as an academic advisor (some departments will consider this to be a required item);
      • serve as thesis/dissertation advisor in the home department;
  2. Research: Either of the following during the previous three years:
    • three refereed publications. Full papers in national proceedings, magazines, although not referred, are of value. It is the responsibility of the candidate to provide evidence of intellectual and scholarly quality. AND
    • at least two of the following:
      • funding to support research (some departments will consider this to be a required item);
      • presentations at state/national conference;
      • externally published manual, study guide, textbook;
      • published book chapter. OR
      •  a published scholarly book or a monograph.
  3. Service: Some of the following during the previous five years:
    • university committee(s);
    • reviewer for a journal or a granting agency;
    • thesis/dissertation committee in other department(s);
    • community service;
    • professional society service

Promotion to Full Professor

  1. Teaching: Each of the following per year:
    • at least two courses with "good" reviews; none with "bad" reviews.
    • at least one of the following (where applicable):
    • serve satisfactorily as an academic advisor (some departments will consider this to be a required item);
    • serve as thesis/dissertation advisor in the home department.
  2. Research: Either of the following per year:
    • refereed publication (a mean of one article per year during the previous five years with a minimum of seven since the last promotion). Full papers in national proceedings, magazines, although not refereed, are of value. It is the responsibility of the candidate to provide evidence of intellectual and scholarly quality. AND
    • at least two of the following:
      • funding to support research (some departments will consider this to be a required item);
      • presentations at state/national conference with proceedings;
      • externally published manual, study guide, textbook;
      • published book chapter. OR
      • a published scholarly book or a monograph.
  3. Service: Each of the following per year:
    • university committee(s);
    • review of publication or granting agency;
    • thesis/dissertation committee in other departments;
    • community service;
    • professional society service

Multi-authored Publication

The committee will evaluate collaborative research and its subsequent multi-authored publication differently from single-authored work. In principle, the committee recognizes that for the evaluation of a promotion candidate, a multi-authored publication shall not be deemed equal to a single-authored publication. Such a principle does not in any way fail to recognize the equal intellectual merit of a single- and multi-authored works.

The principal author should be awarded credit for the work. The department head will identify to the committee the items listed on the résumé where the candidate for promotion has been a principal author. If the candidate is not the principal author nor is he/she the fundraiser, the department head will explain to the committee the extent and significance of the candidate’s contribution to the publication.

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FH Appendix 1: Promotion Dossier Format

Brief History of the Candidate

This section should be a narrative summarizing the candidate’s activities since the last promotion and emphasizing those activities for which promotion is deserved. For candidates recently employed by Florida Tech, appropriate activities at the former employment, as well as at Florida Tech should be delineated and discussed. The current résumé contained in "Résumé" (Appendix A1) should be referenced.

The relative weighting of the dossier sections on "Teaching," "Research" and "Service" may be in any ratio mutually agreeable to the candidate, department head and dean. Once agreed on, such ratio should be stated in the department head’s nomination letter and should be the basis for consideration of the candidacy at the university level.

Teaching and Related Activities

This section should begin with a brief statement of the candidate’s role in our teaching program. It should indicate any areas of special notes such as course development, unique student response, teaching awards, and/or particular effectiveness with unique groups (for example, individual instruction of graduate students or teaching large lecture classes).

Provide a general statement concerning the types of courses taught, i.e., lower-division, upper-division, and graduate-level courses, a list of courses taught in at least the three years in inverse chronological order. Identify which courses were developed by you or which had extensive new material added by you. For each course indicate enrollment, whether the course is required for majors, recommended for majors, or service for non-majors, and indicate what majors, if appropriate, and which of these courses have student-teacher evaluations available. Attach these evaluations as part of "Supporting Documentation for Teaching and Related Activities" (Appendix AII). If student comments are submitted, all students' comments in that course-section must be submitted, i.e., you cannot pick and choose.

Provide a list of graduate students supervised. List separately Ph.D. and master’s students. Give names, dissertation/thesis titles, dates of study and current employment, if known. If any postdoctoral fellows have been supervised, list names. name of fellowship or source of support and dates. Provide a statement concerning participation on graduate student committees or include in the list above, but clearly identify whom you supervised (primary thesis/dissertation advisor) and for whom you were a committee member.

The candidate should provide a statement summarizing his/her interpretation of his/her teaching role and success in teaching at Florida Tech. The statement should present a picture of yourself as a teacher describing, where appropriate, teaching practices in areas such as:

(a) the setting and communicating of course goals;
(b) overall course organization;
(c) class preparation and methods used;
(d) use of supplementary materials such as audiovisual aids, library, laboratory or field experiences;
(e) grading your student work; and
(f) your availability to students having difficulty with course materials or wishing further discussion of course topics.

Where appropriate, comment on:

(a) the method(s) you use to evaluate your teaching;
(b) what you regard as your main strengths as a teacher;
(c) what you regard as areas in which you need improvement as a teacher;
(d) what you are doing to improve upon these goals;
(e) course innovations or development; and
(f) any other item(s) relating to teaching effectiveness

What evidence do you have that your students have the same picture of you?

List academic advising activities. Either give the names of where too many, the approximate numbers of your academic undergraduate and graduate advisees. It would be helpful if you could estimate your advisees retention (conversely attrition) rate for the last several years. It is recognized that your advising is but one factor in retention, but performance significantly better than the Florida Tech average is a powerful attribute to your advising. If the graduate rate of your students over several years is known, please provide.

List other advising, such as student clubs sponsorship and other student counseling. These activities should cover the last three years or more. Provide a separate statement about this advising role and its impact on students and student programs.

Research and Scholarly Activities

The term "research" is used in its broad sense of intellectual inquiry. Essentially, the term "research" is used interchangeably with the term "scholarly activities."

Review briefly the highlights of your research contributions. Emphasize specific contributions to knowledge, but do not become overly technical.

Review your current and future research plans.

Review your research support history and future plans.

List in reverse chronological order externally funded grants and contracts. Include for each the sponsoring agency or company, dates and period of support, number of students supported and amounts funded. Give a separate or contiguous list of projects internally funded or unfunded.

List publications and contributions. List these publications in the following order or in chronological order indicating in the margin the appropriate category. Copies of some or all publications should be included in "Supporting Documentation for Research and Related Activities" (Appendix AIII). If too bulky, part or all of this section may be separated from the main dossier.

  • Books and monographs
  • Articles in refereed journals and books
  • Articles in non-refereed journals or books
  • Articles in refereed journals or books in press
  • Articles in non-refereed journals or books in press
  • Articles in refereed journals or books submitted
  • Articles in non-refereed journals or books submitted
  • Conference presentations and whether the entire paper and/or the abstract only was reviewed.
  • Published technical reports.
  • Other publications such as course manuals, guidebooks, etc.

List and describe briefly any disclosures of inventions or resulting patents.

Provide a brief statement regarding the impact of these publications in the field of research. A recommended indicator of scholarly impact would be a review of the candidate’s publications citation rate. Include a statement of the ranking of these journals in the candidate’s research field.

List invited lectures of special note during the last three years.

The candidate should provide a brief statement on his/her interpretation of the role and success of his/her scholarly activities and discuss plans for future creative work and research. Comment on how you have developed yourself professionally in your discipline since your last promotion/appointment to Florida Tech.

Service Activities

Provide a statement of the candidate’s department and university service for at least the last three years. List in reverse chronological order all significant university, college/school and department/program committee service. Identify your role on each committee and explain the purpose of the committee and explain the purpose of the committee if not obvious.

List committee service for other universities and national or regional educational or professional committees (e.g., review committees, accreditation committees, technical societies, etc.).

Provide a statement of the nature and impact of any unremunerated community service.

Documentation of Professional Practice Activities

This section should be used for candidates to report professional activities that do not fit conveniently under the above headings. Such activities might include consulting, professional clinical practice, short-course development, etc.

List organizations, approximate level of effort and period of consulting. To the extent propriety permits, describe the consulting effort and the work product(s); e.g., reports, drawings, software, new test procedures, etc.

List short-course offerings by title, date, duration, location and approximate attendees. Describe your role as course developer and/or presenter.

Résumé

The résumé should be current and detailed. If the résumé provides the information requested in the above sections, that section can reference the résumé. For example, it is not necessary to list publications in "Research and Scholarly Activities" (Section III) if the data requested is clearly given in the résumé. 

Supporting Documentation for Teaching and Related Activities

Items included in the appendix could include, but not be limited to, student evaluations, peer evaluations, outlines of new courses developed and/or course or laboratory handouts (significant ones only) or manuals. Letters from former or current students could be included as well as copies of instructor/course evaluations. Peer evaluations could include letters from colleagues and/or formal peer reviews if available. Anecdotal information is valued less than is broad based, quantifiable data such as formal evaluations.

Supporting Documentation for Research and Related Activities

Items in this appendix would normally include copies of papers, but could also include copies of proposal abstracts, letters of research awards, or letters of notification of honors, such as outstanding paper awards. If the list of research activities called for in "Research and Scholarly Activities" (Section III) is extensive, it could be included here and referred to in that section.

Supporting Documentation for Service Activities

Items included here could be letters of commendation, copies of service reports authored by the candidate, or more detailed descriptions of service than is possible in "Service Activities" (Section IV).

Supporting Documentation for Professional Practice

Items included here might include notification of professional registration, letters of commendation for consulting or clinical practice, or syllabi and manuals developed for short-courses, workshop or conferences.

Department Head Letter of Nomination

This appendix will contain two important letters:

A brief letter from the candidate addressed to the department head/program chair that states "This letter certifies that I have reviewed my dossier and that the entries and substantiation thereof are accurate."

A letter from the department head/program chair nominating the candidate for promotion. The letter should state the degree of support for the nomination in the department/program. For promotion to full professor, identifying the support of the department’s/program’s full professors is important. Copies of the faculty member’s annual goal/performance evaluations for the past three years could be included in this appendix.

Letters of Recommendation from Outside Reviewers

Include a brief statement of the credentials of each person from whom letters have been solicited. It is expected that for promotion to full (associate) professor at least five (three) letters will be solicited. Include what aspect of the candidate’s performance the referee is competent to judge and why. Include all letters received. These letters should be added to the dossier by the department head/program chair after the candidate has made his/her final review of the dossier to afford the recommender’s confidentiality.

The academic unit head should write all requests for evaluations. The candidate should not solicit these letters although s/he may suggest names of references. The letters of request should clearly state what kind of an evaluation is being sought (the factors to be evaluated, the rank for which the person is being recommended and other pertinent information). Wherever reasonable, one or both of the following questions should be asked. From what you know of this person, would you recommend him/her for promotion at your institution?

Where does the candidate rank among his/her peers? As a courtesy to those being asked to write letters, a current copy of the candidate’s résumé should be sent.

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FH Appendix 4: Promotion Guidelines: College of Aeronautics

Note: edited by Chief Operating Officer (formerly titled 'Provost') for title updates: 7/4/11
Note: edited by Provost for currency: 3/31/05

The College of Aeronautics faculty should be comprised of an ideal mix of two somewhat different backgrounds. The first is the classic academic background enhanced by some direct industry experience. The other is distinguished career in the discipline enhanced by an advanced academic degree. Faculty of both backgrounds must be considered in implementing programs of continued professional development and academic promotion. The established aviation professional who joins the faculty brings to the university an accumulation of knowledge, and a record of accomplishment, that may be unobtainable in the academic environment, yet is essential to the quality of education expected of graduates from a premier aviation program. This background may be the basis for initial appointment at advanced academic rank or be recognized through the promotion process.

The criteria activities listed below provide guidelines for promotion and are not intended to be all-inclusive. Special cases can be made for promotion to Associate Professor. Promotion to the rank of Professor will require successful completion of many of the activities listed, a record of accomplishment above the minimum requirements in several areas and superior performance in at least two of the four major categories. The candidate for promotion to the rank of Associate Professor should have a record of accomplishment as a faculty member and show promise of continued professional growth. A positive recommendation for promotion will be based on successful completion of enough goals to suggest that the candidate has progressed at least half way along the path to the rank of Professor.

In accordance with university policy, consideration for promotion will normally require at least five years of service in the candidate’s current academic rank. A candidate for promotion is expected, first and foremost, to have demonstrated excellence in teaching. In addition, consistent with university promotion criteria, the successful candidate will have demonstrated accomplishments in the areas of scholarly activities and service to the university. The fourth major criteria category provides for recognition of professional accomplishment in the aviation industry and will have weight at least equal to scholarly activity and service.

Detailed procedures including dossier preparation, functioning of the College of Aeronautics Faculty Development Committee, and expansion and explanation of the criteria activities listed below, are published in the College of Aeronautics Promotion Policy and Procedures Manual.

Promotion Criteria

Teaching and Related Activities:

  1. Demonstrate a consistent record of teaching excellence.
  2. Successfully develop student potential through academic advising, counseling and mentoring.
  3. Serve on graduate committees and as major advisor to graduate students.
  4. Develop or significantly modify and improve academic programs.
  5. Develop and introduce new courses into the curriculum.
  6. Introduce innovative or especially effective pedagogical methods.
  7. Produce or make significant contribution to textbooks, reference manuals, computer-aided instructional programs, case studies or other special instructional materials.
  8. Obtain funding for teaching laboratories, and other instructional facilities, equipment and programs.
  9. Help develop the instructional potential of other instructors through mentoring, seminars, articles and other forums.
  10. Demonstrate diversity in a broad range of teaching assignments.

Research/Scholarly Activity

  1. Publish or make significant contribution to a scholarly book.
  2. Publish peer-reviewed articles in professional journals.
  3. Publish articles in scholarly, technical and professional industry publications.
  4. Serve as reviewer of journal articles, books or other publications or contribute to the editing of professional publications.
  5. Obtain funding for research or project activities.
  6. Contribute to advancement of the field of aviation through research and presentation in publications, seminars, lectures and short courses to professionals in the field.
  7. Present papers and lectures at meetings of regional, national or international aviation-related or educational organizations.
  8. Actively participate in seminars, symposia, scholarly conferences and professional education programs.
  9. Actively pursue increased academic qualification and credentials.

 Service

  1. Perform administrative functions within the COA.
  2. Assume an active roll in university committees.
  3. Contribute or provide leadership to COA Committees.
  4. Serve in a leadership role in the faculty senate.
  5. Serve as faculty advisor to student organizations.
  6. Contribute to recruiting and retention of students.
  7. Participate in outreach programs sponsored by the university.
  8. Assist with funding or equipment donations to the university.
  9. Serve as officer, committee chairperson or committee member of a professional, technical or scholarly society.
  10. Participate in conference programs as organizer, moderator, lecturer or chair.
  11. Engage in consulting with government, industry and educational institutions outside the university.
  12. Promote the university and the aviation profession at local, regional and national levels.
  13. Promote industry, government, university interaction.
  14. Provide unremunerated service to the community.
  15. Serve on a national review accreditation committee.

Professional Accomplishments

  1. Attained government or professional certification of special qualification in the field of expertise.
  2. Served an aviation enterprise as a pilot, crewmember, dispatcher, air traffic controller, meteorologist, logistician, or other similar specialty.
  3. Performed as a test pilot or test director, engineer, designer or analyst.
  4. Performed as an aviation accident investigator or safety specialist.
  5. Managed or directed aeronautical development, manufacturing, research, design or testing.
  6. Managed or directed flight operations or support functions.
  7. Managed or directed airport functions, navigational facilities and communications systems.
  8. Served in highly responsible aviation related positions with government agencies such as the FAA, NTSB, DOT, DOD or corresponding foreign or international agencies.
  9. Conducted and reported on aviation research.
  10. Developed, managed or conducted aeronautical professional education and technical training programs.
  11. Planned, directed and conducted evaluations and certification of aviation professionals, functions, and organizations.
  12. Published government or professional documents of significance.
  13. Attained national recognition for aviation-related expertise and accomplishment.
     

 

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FH Appendix 5: Promotion Guidelines: College of Psychology and Liberal Arts

Note: edited by Chief Operating Officer (formerly titled 'Provost') for title updates: 7/4/11
Note: edited by Provost for currency: 3/31/05

These guidelines provide a basis for judgment in evaluating and in rewarding meritorious performance of faculty in the College of Psychology and Liberal Arts of Florida Tech. Promotion is seen as the culmination of efforts aimed at increasing scholarly knowledge and scholarly awareness within the faculty member’s field of interest.

Promotion Procedures

Collection of documentation for the promotion dossier is the responsibility of the candidate requesting promotion. The dossier must follow the same organization and use the same headings and sub-headings as those that are listed in "Promotion Dossier Format." The dean, the Faculty Evaluation Committee or the faculty member may initiate the promotion procedure, but all documentation must go through the Faculty Evaluation Committee whether or not it supports the request.

The Faculty Evaluation Committee (hereafter referred to as the committee) is a three-person committee. Two of the members are full professors and one is an associate professor, all elected by the faculty of the college. One of the three members will be elected specifically to represent diversity. The term of committee members will be two years. Vacancies will be filled by special election of the faculty. The function of the committee is to advise the dean of the college on matters of faculty promotion.

Documentation for promotion (promotion dossier) is presented to and is evaluated by the committee. In case of promotion from associate to full professor, additional external evaluations will be solicited from professionals familiar with the work of the candidate. Names of external reviewers may be provided by the candidate, the committee and/or the dean. Those names may include reviewers who know the candidate personally and those who know of the candidate only through his/her research and publications. The names of the external reviewers will be agreed on by both the committee and the candidate.

The committee makes the recommendation by letter and forwards all documentation to the dean for evaluation. The committee recommendation should list, explain, and interpret the quality of all accomplishments of the candidate for the dean. The committee meets with the dean to explain the strengths and weaknesses of each candidate.

The dean will interview the faculty member under consideration for promotion.

The dean forwards the recommendations of the dean and the committee to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Promotion Eligibility

Assistant Professor

Appointment as an assistant professor shall be based on a candidate’s potential to teach effectively and to advance scholarly knowledge. Potential will typically be determined through the examination of an academic curriculum vitae, letters of recommendation and the presentation of an invited interview and seminar. Multiple year appointment will be considered only for the holder of the terminal degree.

Associate Professor

Promotion of candidates to associate professor is not automatic, but based on the fulfillment of potential in scholarly activities, teaching and service. Although service activities may not contribute to scholarly reputation or teaching excellence, two areas for new faculty to develop, they are activities where new faculty can contribute immediately. Therefore, the pattern of service commitment might be expected to negatively correlate with years of service, as new scholarly pursuits come to fruition. However service commitment should not be so great as to interfere with the development of scholarly pursuits.

Teaching performance of high quality will be expected of all faculty and such performance shall be judged on the basis of peer, ex-student and student evaluation. In the absence of an adequate, universal metric to evaluate teaching performance, the candidate must provide sufficient documentation to support his/her candidacy.

Scholarship/research qualifications shall be judged on the basis of an active and meaningful program of scholarship. Evidence of activity shall be based on the criteria established later in this document (see "Promotion Criteria" below). Evidence of scholarship shall be based on a thorough review of the candidate’s research/scholarship program by the committee.

Qualification in professional and university service shall be based on letters obtained from administrators, supervisors and colleagues in those endeavors and other documentation of activity. Performance in such service must rise above the norm to be considered meritorious. For example, service on several thesis committees is considered the norm and would not itself be sufficient activity to advance the candidate’s consideration in this area.

A candidate may be considered for a promotion to associate professor after a minimum of five years as an assistant professor or equivalent. Requests for early promotion are considered to be exceptional, and should be pursued only in exceptional cases.

Professor

Promotion to professor shall be based on the establishment of a university and a national reputation for scholarship.

The criterion elements for promotion to professor shall be the same as those for promotion to associate professor. However, the level of attainment within these criteria will be higher for promotion to professor, and letters shall be solicited from at least five renowned scholars in the candidate’s specialty.

A candidate may be considered for promotion to professor after a minimum of five years as an associate professor. There is no maximum time limit.

Promotion Criteria

The three areas in which a candidate will be evaluated for promotion are: "Teaching" (including supervision), "Research" (scholarship) and "Service." Each area represents a critical element of performance for a faculty member in the college. However, because promotion to higher rank represents academic status, the areas of teaching and research are weighted more heavily than service.

In collecting recommendation information from current or former students regarding teaching or supervision, the names of the student recommenders will be agreed on by both the committee and the candidate.

The criteria for promotion are described below. The committee, in making a promotion recommendation to the dean, will use these criteria. These criteria set minimum thresholds for promotion eligibility. Faculty who meet these criteria may be considered for promotion. Promotion is to be based on overall excellence of performance as opposed to meeting minimal standards.

Promotion to Associate Professor

Teaching

General categories for consideration and sources for evaluation

  • Classroom excellence
    • Current student evaluations
    • Graduated student evaluations
    • Peer evaluations
  • Clinical supervision
    • Current student evaluations
    • Graduated student evaluations
    • Peer evaluations
  • Research supervision
    • Current student evaluations
    • Graduated student evaluations
    • Peer evaluations
  • Presentations/publications with students as coauthors
    • Copies of documents
  • Developed and introduced innovative pedagogical techniques
    • Commentary from peers and students
  • Received funding from outside agencies or foundations for curriculum development, enhancing teaching laboratories, etc.
    • Documentation of award
  • Introduced new courses into the curriculum, developed new academic programs or made significant modifications to an existing academic program, at the undergraduate and/or graduate level
    • Syllabi, program descriptions and commentary from peers and program chairs
  • Published or made significant contributions to a textbook in his/her field
    • Copy of book

Expectations for threshold performance per year during the previous five years

  • Classroom excellence: at least five courses evaluated “good” as a minimum
  • Clinical supervision: at least five supervision units evaluated “good” as a minimum
  • Research supervision: at least two completed theses with “good” evaluations of the supervisory process
  • Other teaching contributions: accomplishment of at least two of the other elements listed above in the general categories of evaluation

Research/Scholarship

General categories of scholarship for consideration. Sources for evaluation will be copies of product, tables of contents, letters of recognition, etc.

  • Refereed publications
  • Scholarly book in field
  • Book chapters
  • Development of assessment instruments
  • Reviewed presentations at regional meetings
  • Reviewed presentations at national/international meetings
  • Teaching manuals, study guides, workbooks
  • Computer software or Web-based publications
  • Editor or associate/assistant editor of journal in field
  • Non-refereed publications
  • Reviewer for journal articles
  • Served as chair or as part of the organizing committee for national or international society meetings
  • Received grant and/or contract support for research from federal, state or private sources
  • Received recognition for scholarly activities from regional, national or international organizations

Expectations for threshold performance per year during the previous five years. It is expected that assistant professors will gradually establish their scholarly programs. Therefore, promotion to associate professor will emphasize research/scholarly accomplishments that occur after an initial orientation phase (typically, two years).

Activity is expected in these areas:

  • Refereed book chapters or publications: at least three wherein the candidate is major contributor
  • Reviewed presentations at major meetings: at least two wherein the candidate is major contributor

Activity in these areas may supplant deficits in above category:

  • Books: none expected, but may contribute greatly to overall evaluation
  • Assessment instruments, teaching manuals, software, etc.: none expected, but may contribute greatly to overall evaluation
  • Editor, reviewer for professional journal: none expected, but may contribute greatly to overall evaluation
  • Received grant and/or contract support for research from federal, state or private sources: none expected, but may contribute greatly to overall evaluation
  • Received recognition for scholarly activities from regional, national or international organizations.

 Service

General categories of service for consideration. Sources for evaluation will be copies of product, tables of contents, letters of appointment, recognition, thanks, etc.

  • University (e.g., faculty senate, curriculum committee)
  • Served as faculty representative (advisor) to student clubs, societies or organizations
  • Thesis/dissertation committee membership (non-chair)
  • Professional society service (committees for meetings, small-group newsletter editor, etc.)
  • Community service (board of directors for charitable groups, advisor for schools or charitable organizations, etc.)

Expectations for threshold performance per year during the previous five years. It is expected that assistant professors will have service commitments in at least university and school areas.

Promotion to Full Professor

Teaching

General categories for consideration and sources for evaluation

  • Classroom excellence
    • Current student evaluations
    • Graduated student evaluations
    • Peer evaluations
  • Clinical supervision
    • Current student evaluations
    • Graduated student evaluations
    • Peer evaluations
  • Research supervision
    • Current student evaluations
    • Graduated student evaluations
    • Peer evaluations
  • Presentations/publications with students as coauthors.
    • Copies of documents
  • Developed and introduced innovative pedagogical techniques.
    • Commentary from peers and students
  • Received funding from outside agencies or foundations for curriculum development, enhancing teaching laboratories, etc.
    • Documentation of award
  • Introduced new courses into the curriculum, developed new academic programs or made significant modifications to an existing academic program, at the undergraduate and/or graduate level
    • Syllabi, program descriptions and commentary from peers and program chairs
  • Published or made significant contributions to a textbook in his/her field
    • Copy of book

Expectations for threshold performance per year during the previous five years

  • Classroom excellence: at least five courses evaluated “good” as a minimum
  • Clinical supervision: at least five supervision units evaluated “good” as a minimum
  • Research supervision: at least four completed theses with “good” evaluations of the supervisory process
  • Other teaching contributions: accomplishment of at least four of the other elements listed above in the general categories for evaluation

 Research/Scholarship

General categories of scholarship for consideration. Sources for evaluation will be copies of product, tables of contents, letters of recognition, etc.

  • Refereed publications
  • Scholarly book in field
  • Book chapters
  • Development of assessment instruments
  • Reviewed presentations at regional meetings
  • Reviewed presentations at national/international meetings
  • Teaching manuals, study guides, workbooks
  • Computer software or Web-based publications
  • Editor or associate/assistant editor of journal in field
  • Non-refereed publications
  • Reviewer for journal articles
  • Served as chairperson or as part of the organizing committee for national or international society meetings
  • Received grant and/or contract support for research from federal, state or private sources
  • Received recognition for scholarly activities from regional, national or international organizations

Expectations for threshold performance per year during the previous five years. It is expected that associate professors will solidify their scholarly programs during their minimum five-years in rank. Promotion to professor will emphasize not only documentation of individual categories of evaluation, but also the systematic and programmatic character of these activities. Hence, in addition to the demonstration of activity listed below, a characterization of the programmatic quality and overall contribution to the scholarly field is expected from external references.

Activity is expected in these areas:

  • Refereed book chapters or publications: at least five wherein the candidate is major contributor
  • Books: one book or the prospectus for one is expected
  • Reviewed presentations at major meetings: at least five wherein the candidate is major contributor
  • Editor, reviewer for professional journal: either appointment to a panel of reviewers for a journal in the area of scholarship or contribution as an ad hoc reviewer

Activities in these areas may supplant deficits in above category:

  • Assessment instruments, teaching manuals, software, etc: none expected, but may contribute greatly to overall evaluation
  • Received grant and/or contract support for research from federal, state or private sources: none expected, but may contribute greatly to overall evaluation
  • Received recognition for scholarly activities from regional, national or international organizations

Service 

General categories of service for consideration. Sources for evaluation will be copies of product, tables of contents, letters of appointment, recognition, thanks, etc.

  • University (e.g., faculty senate, curriculum committee)
  • Served as faculty representative (advisor) to student clubs, societies or organizations
  • Thesis/dissertation committee membership (non-chair)
  • Professional society service (committees for meetings, small-group newsletter editor, etc.)
  • Community service (board of directors for charitable groups, advisor for schools or charitable organizations, etc.)

Expectations for threshold performance per year during the previous five years. It is expected that associate professors will have service commitments in at least university, school, and professional areas. 

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FH Appendix 6: Promostion Guidelines: Nathan M. Bisk College of Business

Note: edited by Chief Operating Officer (formerly titled 'Provost') for title updates: 7/4/11
Note: edited by Provost for currency: 3/31/05

The College of Business (COB) has established a Faculty Review and Promotions Committee. One of the responsibilities of this committee is the development of promotion criteria guidelines for the COB faculty. These guidelines are derived from the Florida Institute of Technology Faculty Handbook and the mission of the COB. They are intended to provide guidance to the faculty as to the types and quality of professional activities required for promotion. The guidelines are also intended to assist the dean in coaching faculty members and recognizing noteworthy faculty performance.

Promotion Procedures

The individual faculty member candidate is responsible for collecting the documentation for the promotion dossier. The dossier must follow the same organization and use the same terms listed in "Promotion Dossier Format" (Appendix I) of the Faculty Handbook. Either the dean or the faculty member may initiate the promotion procedure; however, all documentation must be forwarded through the dean, whether or not there is support for the promotion.

The promotion dossier must be presented to and evaluated by the dean. For promotion from associate to full professor, at least five external letters must be solicited from professionals familiar with the candidate’s work. At least two of the external letters must not be close colleagues or mentors. The candidate may provide suggested names of those who can serve as external reviewers; however, the dean must be the person who solicits the external evaluation letters.

A letter of recommendation from the dean and the promotion dossier are then forwarded through the vice president for academic affairs to the Committee on Faculty Promotion (CFP) for evaluation.

Promotion Eligibility

Assistant Professor

Appointment as an assistant professor shall be based on a candidate’s potential to teach effectively and to contribute to the advancement of scholarly knowledge. Potential will typically be determined through the curriculum vita, letters of recommendation, and the presentation of an invited interview. Appointment will normally be considered for a holder of the terminal degree.

Associate Professor

Promotion to associate professor at Florida Tech is based on the achievement of goals and the successful performance of activities set forth in the established criteria (as outlined below). Promotion to the rank of associate professor will be based upon a sufficient number of the goals and activities listed below to suggest that the candidate is at least half way along the path to full professorship. A candidate may be considered for promotion to the rank of associate professor after a minimum of five years as an assistant professor or equivalent.

Professor

A candidate may be considered for promotion to professor after a minimum of five years as an associate professor.

Promotion Criteria

The areas for professional development and evaluation for promotion are consistent with those specified in "Promotion Dossier Format" (Appendix I) of the Faculty Handbook. These include (1) Teaching and Related Activities, (2) Research and Scholarly Activities and (3) Service Activities.

Teaching and Related Activities

Candidates for promotion to professor will have a performance record that includes most of the activities specified below. Candidates for promotion to associate professor will demonstrate proficiency in many of the activities listed; enough to suggest that the candidate is at least half way along the path to full professorship.

  1. Consistent, positive student evaluations of classes
  2. Service as advisor for graduate and undergraduate students
  3. Service on and chairing master committees
  4. Service on Ph.D. committees
  5. Service as faculty advisor to student clubs, societies or activities
  6. Service as an external member of student examination committees
  7. Design and introduction of new courses into the curriculum
  8. Development of new academic programs at the undergraduate or graduate level. 

Research and Scholarly Activities

Candidates for promotion to professor will have a consistent record of national and international publications during the years preceding promotion.

  1. Published articles in refereed journals
  2. Published papers in refereed proceedings
  3. Published articles in practitioners’ magazines
  4. Presentations at state/regional/national conferences
  5. Published papers in non-refereed proceedings
  6. Publication of textbook
  7. Contributions to publication of texts, study guides or manuals
  8. Publication of case studies.
  9. Monograph
  10. Chapters of textbooks
  11. Funded research or research grants
  12. Proposals for externally funded research
  13. Publication of COB working paper
  14. Invited speeches related to academic discipline to professional non-academic conferences and public groups

Service Activities

Candidates for promotion to professor will have a record of performance that includes service to the university and local community as well as service to the profession.

Service to university and local community

  1. University governance committees
  2. University academic and examining committees
  3. Participation in student engagement activities
  4. COB committees
  5. Scholarly lectures in non-conference settings
  6. Service to community
  7. Service as member of board of directors for charitable and public service organizations
  8. Service as consultant in area of technical expertise to private or public sector organizations

Service to profession

  1. Professional society service
  2. Service as journal chief editor or area editor
  3. Service as reviewer on papers for refereed journals
  4. Service as reviewer for refereed proceedings and conferences
  5. Session chair, discussant, panelist at state/national/international conferences
  6. Service as member of accreditation visiting teams
  7. Newspaper articles or editorials related to academic discipline

Multi-authored Publications

In principle, collaborative efforts and multi-authored publications are highly valued within the COB. However, for the evaluation of a candidate for promotion, a multiple-authored publication is not assigned the same value as a single-authored publication. In compiling the dossier, the candidate should clearly indicate the identity of the principal author of multi-authored publications, as well as an estimate of the percentage of the candidate’s contribution to the overall effort of each multi-authored publication. This requirement is not intended to denigrate the intellectual merit of multi-authored works, but to answer the questions inevitably asked when the Committee on Faculty Promotions (CFP) meets annually to consider and deliberate on the merits of the promotion dossiers submitted to them for evaluation.

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Final Examinations and Course Material Retention

Examinations

A final examination must be given at the time and day shown in the Final Examination Schedule. Requests for a waiver of time or day must be approved by the vice president for academic affairs; however, a final examination may be given only during "Finals Week." The documentation required by the vice president for academic affairs for consideration of change is a statement requesting the change (including specifics as to time, day and location) with the signature of the instructor and every member of the class. The academic unit head should underwrite the endorsement by his signature.

It is hoped that individual faculty members would try to explain to individuals or to classes the chaos that is created by rescheduling a final examination before he/she or the class spokesperson appeals to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Exceptions to this policy for individual students may be handled by the faculty member in the following cases: 1) student illness or other emergency; 2) student has more than three examinations schedule the same day; and/or 3) one examination time conflicts with another. Priority in the two last cases will be given to adjusting the lower numbered course(s) (i.e., the higher numbered course(s) should follow the published exam schedule).

Course Material Retention

Academic course materials—examinations (final and midterms), papers, projects, homework, etc.—will be retained for a minimum of two calendar years after completion of the course and for a maximum of no more than three calendar years after completion of the course. This retention period applies to academic course materials in both electronic and hard copy.

Academic course materials needed for assessment should be stored separately.

Waivers for the retention period should be addressed with the individual faculty member’s dean.

Faculty who will no longer be teaching for Florida Tech should turn in their retained academic course materials to their academic department head.

This policy does not address document retention related to research and academic administration documents.

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Note: This represents an update to the printed 2013-2014 University Catalog.

University Mission Statement

With our focus on student success, Florida Institute of Technology’s mission is to provide high-quality education to a culturally diverse student body in order to prepare students for entering the global workforce, seeking higher-education opportunities, and serving within their communities. The university also seeks to expand knowledge through basic and applied research and to serve the diverse economic, cultural and societal needs of our local, state, national and international constituencies.

In support of this mission, we are committed to:

  • Fostering and sustaining a productive institutional culture of assessment leading to the continuous improvement of academic and administrative programs in order to promote student development;
  • Developing an organizational culture that values and encourages intellectual curiosity, a sense of belonging and shared purpose among faculty, students and staff, and the pursuit of excellence in all endeavors;
  • Recruiting and developing faculty who are internationally recognized as educators, scholars and researchers;
  • Achieving recognition as an effective, innovative, technology-focused educational and research institution;
  • Recruiting and retaining an excellent, highly select and culturally diverse student body;
  • Continually improving the quality of campus life for all members of the university community;
  • Providing personal and career growth opportunities for both traditional and nontraditional students and members of the faculty and staff;
  • Securing and maintaining professional accreditation for all appropriate programs. 

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Right of Appeal Procedures (Grade Appeals)

 The following grade appeal procedure represents official university policy. These procedures recognize the right:

  1. of each student to receive a grade assigned by a fair and unprejudiced evaluation based on a method that is neither arbitrary nor capricious;
  2. of each student to review all work used in the evaluation with the instructor;
  3. of each student to seek redress, when evidence is available that a mistake has been made in calculating or recording his or her grade or that his or her grade has been assigned based on arbitrary or capricious deviation from the instructor’s stated grading policy; and
  4. of each instructor to assign a grade based on a professionally accepted method that is submitted in writing to everyone in the class and applied equally to all members of the class.

The burden of proof rests with the student for all grade appeals and all relevant documents are filed in the department involved in the appeal. Failure by the student to complete any step of the procedure within the specified time period results in the termination of the appeal with no further recourse. All correspondence with the student will be through the student’s assigned fit.edu email address unless another form of written communication is agreed.

Grade appeals progress as follows:

Step One: The student consults with the course instructor by the end of the third week of the succeeding term in an attempt to understand the instructor’s justification for the grade and to resolve the disagreement in an informal, cooperative atmosphere. The student may eliminate this step only when the instructor is on leave or no longer employed by the university.

Note: All references to instructor apply unless the instructor is on leave or is no longer employed by the university. All parties may agree to discontinue or delay the grade appeal process until all interested parties are available on campus.

Step Two: If a resolution is not reached in Step One, the student presents the written complaint to the head of the department in which the grade was assigned within five business days after consulting with the instructor. Supporting evidence (course syllabus and copies of graded assignments, when available) should be included with the written appeal.

The department head verifies the requirements of Step One have been satisfied before acting on the appeal and within seven business days after receiving the appeal and supporting evidence, meets jointly or separately with the student and the instructor in an attempt to resolve the dispute.

 If, in the opinion of the department head,

  1. the student’s appeal lacks merit, the student and the instructor will be notified in writing within five business days after the department head’s consultation with the student and the instructor; or
  2. the instructor assigned the grade in a manner not in accordance with the rights outlined above, the department head provides written recommendation to the instructor to change the grade within five business days after consultation with the student and the instructor.

Within five business days after receiving the department head’s recommendation the instructor shall provide a written response to the department head.

Within five business days after receiving the instructor’s written response, the department head communicates the status of the appeal to the student and the instructor.

Step Three: If the appeal is not resolved in Step Two within five business days after receiving the notification from the department head, the student may appeal to the dean of the college in which the course is taught. The dean gives written notification to the department head and the instructor that an appeal has been made.

All previously submitted documents together with additional written statements from all parties concerned are sent to the dean, who, within seven business days after receiving the appeal and supporting evidence shall meet in joint or separate consultation with the parties.

If the department head and the dean concur the student’s request lacks merit, the appeal ends and the student has no further recourse. The dean informs all parties in writing within five business days after consultation with them.

If, in the opinion of the dean, the instructor assigned the grade in a manner not in accordance with the rights outlined above, the dean provides written recommendation within five business days after consultation with the parties concerned to the instructor to change the grade.

Within five business days after receiving the dean’s recommendation the instructor provides a written response to the dean. If the dean’s recommendation is that the student’s grade should be changed and the instructor agrees to change the grade, the instructor completes a Change of Grade form and once it is signed, submits it to the Office of the Registrar. The dean communicates the status of the appeal to all parties concerned within five business days after receiving the instructor’s decision.

If the instructor disagrees with the dean’s decision and/or declines to change the grade, the dean communicates the instructor’s response to the vice president for academic affairs. If the vice president for academic affairs concurs with the dean’s decision, notification is sent to the registrar’s office to change the grade. The dean communicates the status of the appeal to all parties concerned within five business days after receiving the vice president for academic affairs’ decision. The decision of the vice president for academic affairs is final.

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Faculty Online Grading Procedures

Online grading is the official mode of submitting grades. All grading is completed through Web for Faculty (www.fit.edu/paws). Instructors/faculty will be informed via email from the Registration Center that grading is enabled in Web for Faculty. Web for Faculty will list only the courses taught by the faculty member logged in for the selected term. Only the instructor of the course listed in Banner will be able to enter grades.

The drop-down grade box will show only those grades to be used for the course (i.e., A-F, I, P/F, S/U). Faculty may enter grades and/or change grades online up until the 4 p.m. deadline. Any grades not entered by 4 p.m. on the day grades are due will be defaulted to a grade of NR (no record). Contact the Registration Center for instructions on submitting grades to replace NRs.

Faculty of 1000- and 2000-level courses must enter midterm grades. 

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Policy on Retaining Final Examination Documents

It is the policy of Florida Tech that university departments retain all final examination papers and documents for a period of not less than one academic year. 

 

This policy has been superseded by "Final Examination and Course Material Retention Policy."

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Standards for Faculty Credentials and Records

Note: This document may be downloaded in pdf format here.

Florida Institute of Technology is committed to hiring qualified, effective faculty members to carry out the goals of the institutional mission and to ensure the quality and integrity of its academic programs. In doing so the institution meets, and strives to exceed, the minimum requirements set forth by regional accreditation. Academic credentials are the primary and standard qualification for faculty members; however other types of qualifications may prove to be appropriate. Documentation and justification of qualifications for each member of the faculty, both full-time and part-time, are the responsibility of the entire institution. 

SACSCOC Comprehensive Standard 3.7.1 (2012 version): The institution employs competent faculty members qualified to accomplish the mission and the goals of the institution. When determining acceptable qualifications of its faculty, an institution gives primary consideration to the highest earned degree in the discipline. The institution also considers competence, effectiveness, and capacity, including, as appropriate, undergraduate and graduate degrees, related work experiences in the field, professional licensure and certifications, honors and awards, continuous documented excellence in teaching, or other demonstrated competencies and achievements that contribute to effective teaching and student learning outcomes. For all cases, the institution is responsible for justifying and documenting the qualifications of its faculty. (Faculty competence)

Academic Credentials. Academic credential guidelines for faculty are provided by SACS Commission on Colleges.  These are:

  • Faculty teaching general education courses at the undergraduate level: doctoral or master’s degree in the teaching discipline or master’s degree with a concentration in the teaching discipline (a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching discipline).
  • Faculty teaching associate degree courses designed for transfer to a baccalaureate degree: doctoral or master’s degree in the teaching discipline or master’s degree with a concentration in the teaching discipline (a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching discipline).
  • Faculty teaching associate degree courses not designed for transfer to the baccalaureate degree: bachelor’s degree in the teaching discipline, or associate’s degree and demonstrated competencies in the teaching discipline.
  • Faculty teaching baccalaureate courses: doctoral or master’s degree in the teaching discipline or master’s degree with a concentration in the teaching discipline (minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching discipline). At least 25 percent of the discipline course hours in each undergraduate major are taught by faculty members holding the terminal degree—usually the earned doctorate—in the discipline.
  • Faculty teaching graduate and post-baccalaureate course work: earned doctoral/terminal degree in the teaching discipline or a related discipline.
  • Graduate teaching assistants: master’s in the teaching discipline or 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching discipline, direct supervision by a faculty member experienced in the teaching discipline, regular in-service training, and planned and periodic evaluations.

Faculty Records: Florida Tech maintains a record of faculty credentials for every faculty member in appropriate academic offices. Each file must include: (1) an official transcript for the highest degree earned, as well as those for any other relevant degree, such as master’s and bachelor’s degrees; (2) official transcripts or official versions of certificates and licensures, if applicable; (3) a completed Faculty Roster Form that includes the courses to be taught (this is an accreditation requirement); and (4) a statement of alternative qualifications (SOAQ) for any faculty member not meeting the Academic Credentials listed above.

For purposes of accreditation, transcripts/certificates/licensures are considered official only if they are sent directly from the granting institution to the appropriate academic office. They must be requested, and paid for, by the prospective faculty member. Transcripts from international institutions that are not in English must be accompanied by an original translation and evaluation from a credential evaluation service agency recognized by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES). Transcripts from non-regional accredited institutions in the United States will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

SOAQs must address how the candidate’s alternative qualifications relate to specific courses to be taught and should include as many of the following as apply to a particular situation:

  • competence and effectiveness
  • as appropriate, undergraduate and graduate degrees
  • non-teaching work related experience in the field
  • professional licensure and certifications
  • honors and awards
  • continuous documented excellence in teaching
  • other demonstrated competencies and achievements that contribute to effective teaching and student learning outcomes

Should the courses to be taught change at some future date, the statement of alternative qualifications and the Faculty Roster Template must be updated to include these new courses.

*No faculty member will be allowed to teach until faculty records are complete.*

 Appropriate academic offices where faculty records are to be maintained are as follows:

  • For full-time faculty: the Office of the Chief Operating Officer. 
  • For faculty teaching Florida Tech University Online programs: the Office of Online Learning
  • For faculty teaching at Extended Studies sites and through the Virtual Campus: the office of the Extended Studies Department
  • For departmental adjunct faculty: the appropriate departmental office.

An electronic profile for every faculty member is maintained in our faculty credential software, currently Xitracs.  In addition to copies of transcripts, certificates, and licensures, the profile must include, for purposes of accreditation, a current curriculum vita that includes the following sections, as applicable:

  1. Education: include all Bachelor’s, Master’s, Ph.D., and/or terminal degrees
  2. Academic Appointments with dates: including current position
  3. Other credentials: any professional licensures, certificates, honors and/or awards that relate to courses to be taught
  4. Related professional experience: list additional work-related experiences that relate to courses to be taught
  5. Grants, publications, presentations: as they relate to courses to be taught
  6. Membership in professional organizations

 For uniformity, all curriculum vitae will be no longer than five pages.

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Faculty Grievance[1] Resolution Procedure

This procedure is intended to provide a fair, internal process for resolving complaints and or grievances that may arise from faculty members. This procedure only applies to faculty members as defined within the Faculty Handbook of Florida Institute of Technology under FH2.1 Academic Rank (http://assets.fit.edu/scripts/policy_view.php?id=4364).

General

A faculty member who believes that he/she has a legitimate grievance should attempt to resolve the matter informally. The faculty member should bring the complaint or dispute to the individual or group with whom he/she has the grievance in an attempt to resolve the problem through informal discussion. The formal procedure set forth below is not meant to supersede attempts to resolve complaints through other means. The procedure should be used only after every effort has been made to settle the dispute informally. This procedure has been modeled after several other such university procedures throughout the United States.

Procedure

The following procedure should be used for faculty members wishing to file a formal complaint.

  1. The faculty member must use the organizational structure to which he/she reports.
  2. The complaint must be in writing and contain at a minimum the following information:
    1. The nature and extent of the problem;
    2. An indication of what policies and/or procedures are allegedly being violated;
    3. Identification of the alleged person/persons responsible for the problem;
    4. The attempts made to resolve the problem; and
    5. Remedy sought.
  3. The complaint will be acted on within a two to three week timeframe to find a suitable solution.
  4. If the faculty member is not satisfied with the resolution of the complaint at the organizational reporting level, this matter may be taken to the Faculty Ombudsman Committee[2].
    1. Ombudsman Committee: Three senior faculty members are appointed by the chief operating officer to serve as an ombudsman committee to hear grievances (other than those associated with termination) that a faculty member does not feel comfortable pursuing through the usual organizational structure, i.e., department head, dean, chief operating officer or the president. Usually, the faculty member approaches one member of the committee and describes the problem. They then decide whether other members of the committee should be involved and the best approach to resolving the problem. If resolution of the problem requires disclosure of the member's identity, such disclosure is made only with the approval of the faculty member making the complaint.
    2. Members[3]of the committee include:
      • Alan Leonard, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences
      • Phil Farber, Associate Professor, Clinical Psychology program, School of Psychology
      • John Windsor, Professor, Department of Marine and Environmental Systems
  5. If the faculty member is still not satisfied with the resolution of the complaint at the Faculty Ombudsman Committee, a request can be made for the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (EVP/COO) (or designee) to handle the complaint. This request must be submitted in writing to the Office of the EVP/COO within two weeks after the notice of resolution by the department head, dean and/or Ombudsman Committee. The decision made by the Office of the EVP/COO shall be deemed as final.

Clarification

A grievance is a complaint by a faculty member that he/she has been adversely affected in his/her professional activities as a result of an arbitrary and capricious act or failure to act or a violation of a university or college procedure or regulation by the complainant’s supervisor, administrator, peer or administrative body.

The grievance procedure may NOT be used for:

  1. Complaints alleging discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, gender, age, religion, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, disability, marital status or veteran status. As referenced in FH2.6, “It is Florida Tech’s policy and practice to prohibit discrimination because of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veteran status or any other discrimination prohibited by law.”
  2. The university, as an Equal Opportunity Employer, has adopted standards and practices that insure all applicants for employment and all employees are treated in a fair and impartial manner that recognizes the dignity of each individual and allows selection and advancement based on qualifications and abilities. If a faculty member feels he/she has been discriminated against regarding access to employment, hiring, promotion, compensation, job assignment or fringe benefits solely because of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veteran status or any other discrimination prohibited by law, he/she is entitled to request review by an ad hoc Faculty Senate grievance committee (see policy “Dismissals and Terminations”). See references to the Ombudsman Committee in the policy “Standing Committees of the Academic Faculty.”
  3. Complaints pertaining to general levels of salary, fringe benefits, or other broad areas of financial management and staffing.
  4. Disputes that are personal in nature or do not involve the complainant’s professional activities.
  5. A complaint, the resolution or remedy of which would conflict with a current policy approved by the Faculty Senate, university administration, current policy of Florida Institute of Technology, federal, state or local law or regulation, or any contract to which the university is a party.
  6. A complaint pertaining to an issue within the purview of any other standing committee or policy of the university or college, unless the complaint arises from a committee’s alleged failure to act or to follow the policies or procedures of the university or college.


[1] The terms grievance and complaint will be used interchangeably throughout this procedure.

[2] Section FH1.5 Standing Committees of the Academic Faculty (http://www.fit.edu/faculty/handbook/print.php)

[3] Subject to change.

 

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Do You Need Help Studying?

The Academic Support Center is here to serve you and do everything possible to assure that you are successful in your studies at Florida Tech. We are located adjacent to the teaching auditorium (P-133) of the Evans Library Pavilion. The Learning Center is at the south entrance and the Director’s Office is at the north entrance.

At the Academic Support Center, you can:

  • Discuss academic concerns with the Director.
  • Request one-on-one tutoring.
  • Receive help in composition or in writing research papers, reports or speeches.
  • Attend small group study sessions
  • Review and improve  study skills via self-help audio tapes, videotapes and written materials.
  • Find out about the services available to you on campus.

We want to help you achieve your goals at Florida Tech. Visit our center or call ext. 8009.

Do You Know Who Your Advisor Is?

Your academic advisor is a very important person in your college career. She or he is here to help you achieve your educational goals, career goals and personal goals. To be successful, it is crucial that you develop a good relationship with your advisor. The responsibility for a successful advising relationship and college career is yours. Make the most of the academic advising process by initiating or maintaining this relationship today.

When To See Your Advisor

  • To discuss any problems that affect academic performance.
  • To select courses for the upcoming semester.
  • To anticipate when to take courses that are offered infrequently.
  • To add or drop courses.
  • To register to take a course pass-fail or audit.
  • To discuss academic progress.
  • To declare a major.
  • To file a degree plan.
  • To petition for graduation.
  • To discuss career considerations.

How You And Your Faculty Advisor Should Work Together

When you were admitted to Florida Tech you were assigned to a faculty advisor for both educational and vocational guidance and advising. Because your advisor is responsible for counseling a group of student advisees as needs occur, the following suggestions are offered to you to help enhance your experiences with your advisor:

  • You should contact and keep in touch with your advisor.
    •  Your advisor should post office hours.
  • You should make and keep appointments or call if it is necessary to change or cancel an appointment.
    • Your advisor should keep appointments or call if it is necessary to change or cancel an appointment.
  • You should come with specific questions in mind.
    • Your advisor should provide accurate and specific information.
  • You should come with necessary materials (pencils, Schedule of Courses, forms, etc.).
    • Your advisor should have on hand resource materials.
  • You should ask about other sources of information.
    • Your advisor should suggest other sources of information.
  • You should be open concerning schoolwork, study habits, academic progress, etc.
    • Your advisor should listen to you and help you solve problems.
  • You should build a schedule free of time conflicts.
    • Your advisor should check your schedule for appropriate selection of courses.
  • You should make decisions concerning careers, choice of majors, and selection of courses.
    • Your advisor should suggest options concerning careers, choice of majors and selection of courses. 

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FH 2.15 Policies Governing Outside Work by Faculty Members

Full-time faculty at Florida Tech accept their appointment with the understanding that their primary employment responsibility is to the university. The university encourages faculty members to offer professional advice concerning the development of the natural resources of the state, or on new products or new scientific apparatuses and techniques; to conduct research, and prepare and publish results of their studies; to make addresses on subjects in which they are qualified and that are of public interest; and to serve as officers or as members of committees of learned and scientific societies. Such activities are not normally considered as outside work.

Ordinary private business of faculty members, such as investing money or the hiring of labor in private undertakings, is not considered to fall within the purview of regulation by the university, provided the business is of such a character as not to damage in any way the prestige of the university and entails no loss of time or efficiency in the performance of university duties.

Occasions may arise when it will be mutually beneficial to the university and the faculty member for the latter to serve as a consultant to local industry or national science organizations. Florida Tech Consulting provides access to these needs under a broad policy statement that establishes principles that guide faculty members when causes of this nature arise. See www.fit.edu/consulting.

 The principles are:

 1)   A member of the faculty who desires to engage in consulting shall do so only after obtaining the approval of his/her academic unit head.

2)   Outside employment must not interfere with full and proper performance of university duties; shall not exceed one day per week; and in no way be detrimental to the best interest of the university.

3)   No university equipment, supplies or clerical services may be used in the furtherance of outside work for pay except in highly unusual cases and following approval of appropriate administrative officials. Work done through Florida Tech Consulting is an exception to this as long as it is done on a non-interference basis.

 

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FH 2.15.1 Conflict of Interest

www.fit.edu/hr

REVIEW AND OVERSIGHT RESPONSIBILITIES

The responsibility for adhering to the rules on conflict of interest and outside activities rests with the faculty member. Full disclosure and discussion of all potential and actual conflicts makes it possible to address issues and prevent future problems arising for the faculty member or the university. The review and oversight responsibility rests with the department head and the dean or director of the college or other academic unit in which the faculty member is employed. Faculty must provide sufficient information to those with review and oversight responsibility for an informed decision concerning the outside activity or financial interest. The deans and directors are the designees of the president of the university in implementing the university’s policies on outside activities and financial interests. It is their responsibility to make sure the annual employment contract indicates no outside activities or financial interests need be reported. The deans and directors are responsible for ensuring that all copies of the completed disclosure forms are appropriately distributed in a timely manner to the faculty member and the department head or other appropriate administrator.

USE OF UNIVERSITY NAME

Any faculty member engaging in independent outside activities must recognize that he/she is performing such activities as an individual and cannot represent that he/she is acting on behalf of the university.

For example, a faculty member may not use Florida Tech letterhead or a Florida Tech e-mail address in conducting outside activities. The faculty member must take reasonable precautions to insure that the outside employer or other recipient of services understands the employee is engaging in the outside activity as a private citizen and not as an employee, agent or spokesperson of the university.

USE OF UNIVERSITY EQUIPMENT, FACILITIES OR SERVICES

Any use of university equipment, facilities or services with regard to an outside activity must be approved before the activity. In general, the use of these resources will be allowed only on a noninterference basis, and a charge may be assessed.

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FH 2.15.2 Florida Tech Consulting

www.fit.edu/consulting/

Florida Tech Consulting assists faculty in marketing their expertise and services, and offers these resources to the industrial community both nationally and internationally.

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FH 2.19 Policy on Copyrights and Patents

Preamble

In adopting this policy, the board of trustees recognizes there may be research projects sponsored by governmental authorities, industrial concerns or others, which may entitle the sponsors to the ownership, without payment or any royalty to any person. “Ownership” as used in this document refers both to ownership of a discovery or invention made by a faculty member as to which there is a reasonable likelihood of obtaining a patent; and to ownership of copyrightable material authored by a faculty.

FH 2.19.1 Creation of Patent and Copyright Committee

The board of trustees has authorized the president to appoint a Patent and Copyright Committee with the authority and responsibility provided for below, and that will be comprised of three members of the university faculty and three members of the university administrative staff.

FH 2.19.2 Discoveries and Inventions.

1. Disclosure, Discoveries and Inventions
Any faculty member who has made a discovery or invention that in his/her judgment reasonably appears to be patentable, shall bring such discovery of invention to the attention of the president of the university or his designated representative, who will refer it to the committee to determine whether and to what extent the university has an interest in the discovery or invention. Any such discovery or invention shall be disclosed promptly, but in any event within 60 days.

2. Ownership of Discoveries and Inventions
a. A discovery or invention developed as a direct result of the regular duties of a faculty member or as a result of research done on or in connection with theses or dissertations or as a result of a program of research financed wholly or in part by university funds or by funds under the control of the university shall except otherwise owned for reasons mentioned in the Preamble, be the exclusive property of the university. The ownership of any such discovery or invention and any patent rights shall be assigned to the university or its designee and shall be administered in accordance with the determination of the committee.

b. A discovery or invention developed by a faculty member shall be the exclusive property of the inventor(s) if all the following conditions exist.

(1) If the university has contributed nothing substantial or essential to the production and development of such discovery or invention in funds, space, facilities or personnel, including students.

(2) If the discovery or invention is not related to any university research then in progress or to which the university is committed, and to which the faculty member is connected.

(3) If the discovery or invention was developed by the faculty member(s) on his/her or their own time without any expense to the university.

c. If there is a difference of opinion as to whether a discovery or invention is within (a) or (b) above, or if within neither, the ownership and determination of any equities of the discovery or invention shall be decided by the committee, and subject to appeal to the president of the university. Once the decision has been rendered, it is binding on the university and the faculty member who made the discovery or invention.

3. Authority and Responsibility of Committee with Respect to Discoveries and Inventions
The committee, subject to appeals to the president listed here, has the following authority and responsibility with respect to discoveries and inventions:

a. To receive and act on reports of discoveries and inventions.

b. To determine the ownership of discoveries and inventions, and the dates of their conception, disclosure and reduction to practice.

c. To determine the equities of the university, the inventor(s) and any other parties in discoveries and inventions; and to provide equitably for sharing royalties received for any patented or patentable discovery or invention in which the university has a property interest between the university and the inventor with the following.

(1) Where an agreement, letter or other document involving the university and another party having an interest in a discovery or invention requires royalties on the discovery or invention to be distributed in a particular manner. In all other cases, the procedure set out in 2, 3 and 4 shall be followed, provided that where an agreement, letter or other document places a limit on the amount of royalties to be paid, the amount of royalties paid shall not exceed that limit.

(2) The university shall retain all royalties until it has fully recovered all expenses incurred in connection with the filing and prosecution of a patent application.

(3) The next $2,500 of such royalties shall be paid to the inventor(s) of the discovery or invention.

(4) Royalties received beyond those required to meet the conditions specified in 1, 2 and 3 above shall be divided as follows:

i. One-third of royalties received shall be retained by the university.

ii. One-third shall be paid to the inventor(s) in accordance with their rights.

iii. One-third shall be paid to the primary academic department(s) of the inventor(s) according to propor- tionate participation as determined in “d” below.

d. To determine the financial returns from the discovery or invention due each inventor when there are co-inventors.

e. To determine whether the university should attempt to obtain a patent or submit the discovery to the university’s patent agent, in the case of the university having a property interest. Any such determination shall be made within two months from the date the discovery was disclosed to the committee or, if sooner, within 30 days after the written request is received from the president of the university or from the inventor.

f. To determine whether the university shall pursue a patent application or assign any right it may have in the discovery, when the committee submits a discovery or invention to the university’s patent agent and the agent decides either not to file the application or abandon an application already filed. The inventor shall be notified of the determination within 30 days after the receipt by the committee of notice from the university’s patent agent.

g. To report its findings and determinations to the president of the university and other interested parties within 120 days, except in those situations for which a different period of time for making a determination is established.

h. To report its findings to the president of the university on all matters pertaining to patentable research or patents offered to the university by gift, devise, purchase, sale or assignment, regardless of the potential value or circumstances under which such patentable research or patents were discovered.

4. Management and Exploitation of Patents.
The president of the university shall be the final authority to determine how patents that are the property of the university shall be managed and exploited.

FH 2.19.3 Copyrightable Material

1. Rights of Authors
In accordance with other institutions of higher learning and except as provided for in Paragraph 2 below, the right of first publication and of statutory copyright in any book, manuscript, television or motion picture script or film, educational material or other copyrightable work, whose author is a faculty member, shall be the property of the author.

2. Rights of the University
Copyrightable material resulting from a project assigned to faculty as a part of their regular duties shall inure to the university only if so specified in writing and signed by the faculty member, their department head and the dean.

3. Authority and Responsibility of Committee with Respect to Copyrightable Materials
The committee has the same authority and responsibility with respect to copyrightable material authored by a faculty member as it has in respect of discoveries or inventions made by such persons and dealt with in “Discoveries and Inventions” (FH 2.19.2 ). The specific authority and responsibility of the committee with respect to discoveries and inventions described in Paragraph 3 of FH 2.19.2, shall apply with equal force to copyrightable material owned in total or in part by the university.

4. Notice to Committee
Department heads, deans and directors shall notify the committee in writing of any work assigned in accordance with Paragraph 2 above, “Rights of the University,” which might result in a manuscript or other property for which copyright may be obtainable.

FH 2.19.4 Publication of Material Relating to Discoveries, Inventions and Scholarly Investigation

The board of trustees recognizes and wishes to give the fullest possible cooperation to traditional principles and practices of academic freedom in connection with the publication of writings that relate to discoveries and inventions. At the same time, it is recognized that governmental authorities, industrial concerns or other organizations that sponsor research projects may require temporary restriction on publication to protect the sponsor’s interest in patentable inventions or discoveries, or because of the national interest or other reasons considered sufficient by the sponsor. The committee will determine if the university has been authorized or required by the sponsor to determine whether or not publication would be in compliance with such restrictions and/or conditions.

FH 2.19.5 Appeals from Committee Determinations

If any interested persons are dissatisfied with the determination by the committee of any matter relating to any discovery, invention, patent, copyright or copyrightable material, or publication of any writing, such person may request the determination be reviewed by the president of the university. Any such request shall be made in writing and delivered to the committee no later than fifteen (15) days after receipt of notice of the determination that he/she regards as unsatisfactory, or within fifteen (15) days after the expiration date when the committee should have reported its findings to interested parties. On receipt of such a request, the committee will forward it with its determinations and recommendations to the president, unless the committee reconsiders or modifies its previous determination to the satisfaction of all parties. The president may affirm, modify or revise the committee’s determination, and his determination shall be binding on all interested parties. The committee will assist the president in reviewing any such matter as the president may request.

FH 2.19.6 Policy on Stored Course Materials

The current Florida Tech intellectual property policy as contained in this document focuses on traditional copyright and patent issues, and creates a balance between the goals of creating and disseminating knowledge, and deriving revenue from commercially viable inventions. Through this policy faculty retain ownership of copyright material while they are required to disclose all creations or inventions that have patent potential to the standing committee on intellectual property. The committee reviews each circumstance and recommends a course of action (seek a patent, return the rights to the creator or some other appropriate process).

The policy also contains a provision where the university and the creator of copyright material can create a contract for the investment of resources, the control over the product and the associated rights. As educational material is now frequently created, stored and reused in a digital format, it is necessary to establish procedures to govern this stored course material.

Digital intellectual property creates new forms of value and has an extended life that makes it commercially viable. These products are changing the format, content and economics of educational delivery. This extension to the intellectual property policy sets out some basic principles for stored course materials that will mutually benefit the creators and the university, but does not address patent or trademark rights and is not intended to apply to traditional printed materials such as books and lecture notes. A primary concern is to promote the broadest possible creation and dissemination of knowledge while protecting academic freedom.

With the university’s encouragement and support, faculty members are creating course material that can be reused. Digital course segments range from simple or inexpensive productions to major investments:

1) If the stored course material is created by full-time faculty in the context of the normal duties and does not involve substantial use of Florida Tech resources, the ownership of the intellectual property remain with the creator.

2) If a substantial use of Florida Tech resources is involved in the creation of the product, the university and the faculty member should plan together to recover its investment over time. A separate contact must be developed at the start of the project to cover the concerns and interests of the creator(s) and the university. This includes intellectual property rights as well as such matters as initial investments, protections, editorial control, marketing, royalties, extended use and eventual disposition.

Substantial use is defined as a threshold for the investment of institutional resources that requires additional planning and preparation to recover this investment over some period of time. If use is substantial, the university is acting with the faculty member as a partner in the development of stored materials and will have rights to those materials.

DEFINING SUBSTANTIAL USE

A faculty member makes substantial use of university resources if the use significantly exceeds the customary level needed to support teaching responsibilities. Under the supervision of the dean, the department head determines if the development of stored material makes substantial use of university resources. The input of service providers whose services were used or may be used is relevant to this determination. Factors to be considered in the determination include, but are not limited to, the following.

1) Use of an online presentation system like ANGEL, which is offered to all faculty for normal use in their courses does not count toward substantial use.

2) A course stored and offered later or offered remotely by the university does not count toward substantial use.

3) Use of any materials or services paid for out of an external grant to the faculty member does not count toward substantial use.

4) Technology Enhanced Content (TEC) resources, when providing faculty with basic training in multimedia course development, does not count toward substantial use.

5) TEC resources, if paid for by the faculty member at the university’s then-current rate for use of the lab, does not count toward substantial use.

6) TEC resources, for which no reimbursement is made, is presumed to be substantial if the TEC staff considers it will be substantial or that further effort would make a use substantial.

7) Use of the library is not normally substantial, but extensive use of the library staff as research assistants could contribute toward a determination of substantial use.

8) Faculty developing and/or teaching a course as part of his/her normal teaching responsibilities on campus, and without a compensatory reduction in teaching load or significant additional teaching or support staff, DOES NOT count toward substantial use.

A determination of whether or not use of university resources is “substantial” is not a determination that the proposed use is reasonable or within the capacity of the university’s service providers. Service providers (such as the library or TEC facilities) have limited resources. Whether or not a use is deemed substantial under this definition, the service provider may advise a faculty member the proposed use is significant, it must be approved by the department head or dean, extra funding will be required to provide the level of service requested or the service cannot be provided in the time frame requested.

NOTE: TEC resources are those facilities provided to develop technology-enhanced content. This is an expanding role in terms of services and service providers. TEC is subject to competing demands for limited resources and is required to maximize the use of institutional resources in achieving Florida Tech’s educational and research goals.

WHEN THERE IS NO SUBSTANTIAL USE

If a faculty member does not make substantial use of university facilities in the development of copyrightable course materials, the copyright to those materials will belong to the faculty member, not to the university. The university may not make use of these materials in other courses without permission of the faculty member. The faculty member has the same rights to use these materials in other courses or at other schools, as he/she would have if they were written lecture notes.

WHEN THERE IS SUBSTANTIAL USE

If a faculty member does make substantial use of university resources in the development of copyrightable course materials, the university will have rights to those materials. The faculty member and the university should enter into a contract before development of any materials.

If there is no written contract between the faculty member and the university, a contract will be implied and include the following terms.

1) The faculty member will own the copyright to the materials, but the university will have a license to use the materials.

2) The university may use the materials in courses not taught by the faculty member for one year after the end of the first course that used the materials, even if the faculty member leaves the university before this year has ended. The university may continue to use the materials indefinitely if the faculty member does not instruct the university to stop using the materials.

3) The faculty member will have artistic and editorial control over the materials, subject to any constraints the university may impose on the nature and level of its investment.

4) The faculty member may revise the materials. Normally, the university will make reasonable efforts to work with the faculty member to revise the materials in a reasonable time. However, the university shall accelerate its efforts if the faculty member believes, in good faith that continued use of some material(s) would damage her/his reputation or expose the university or faculty member to a successful lawsuit. In either case, the university shall make its best effort to work with the faculty member to promptly revise the materials in a way that is satisfactory to the faculty member.

5) The faculty member will deposit a copy of the materials with the university library, which it will hold as noncirculating reference materials for local use only and not for use in interlibrary loans.

6) In the event of a lawsuit, the same rules for liability allocation apply to stored course materials as to live materials. However, (a) If the university or the faculty member uses the materials without revision after being advised of a legal risk by the other, the using party assumes all risk, and indemnifies and holds the other party harmless from all legal claims arising from matters warned about by the other party. (b) If the university sublicenses materials to a third party, it is the university that bears the risk of any liability in connection with the third party’s use of the materials. (c) If one of the parties uses the materials outside of their geographic scope, that party assumes all risk and holds the other party harmless from all legal claims arising out of differences in legal rules in the out-of-scope geographic area. (The normal geographic scope is the country in which the faculty member teaches for the university.)

A typical contract will include additional terms, for example:

1) The university will normally be granted a longer term, at least two years after the end of the first course that uses the materials, during which it can use the materials.

2) In the absence of a contract, the university will not owe the faculty member a royalty or fee for using the materials in courses not taught by the faculty member. The contract may specify such a royalty or fee.

3) The university will normally be granted a right to sublicense the materials to other institutions, and the contract will specify the maximum term of the sublicense that the university may grant. In the absence of a contract, the university may not sublicense the materials.

4) If the university sublicenses the course materials, the license fee will normally be divided equally between the university, the faculty member’s department and the faculty member.

5) The faculty member may be granted a right to sublicense the materials to other institutions. The contract will specify the maximum term of the sublicense the faculty member may grant, and the royalty or fee due the university. In the absence of a contract, the faculty member may not sublicense the materials.

6) The faculty member may be granted the right to market and use these course materials in courses presented independently of the university. If so, it will specify the royalty or fee due the university for such presentations. In the absence of a contract, the faculty member many not market or use these materials outside of the university without permission of the university.

7) The university may be granted the right to modify the course materials. In the absence of a contract, modifications may not be made without the approval of the faculty member.

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