Resources

Resources

We suggest that parents and families read one of our recommended books prior to their student starting college.

For Families

Letting Go: A Parent's Guide to Understanding the College Years
By: Karen Levin Coburn and Madge Lawrence Treeger

Sallie Mae How to Pay for College: A Practical Guide for Families
By: Gen Tanabe and Kelly Y. Tanabe

Getting In Without Freaking Out
By: Arlene Matthews

Books for New Students

Confessions of a College Freshman
By: Zach Arrington

The Real Freshman Handbook
By: Jennifer Hanson

Campus Life Exposed
By: Harlan Cohen

The Naked Roommate
By: Harlan Cohen

Books for Transfer Students

Transfer Student's Guide to the College Experience
By: Nadine S. Koch and K. William Wasson

College Student's Guide to Transferring Schools
By: Jennifer Wilcha and David A. Smith

Communication with Your Son/Daughter

Encourage them to get involved on campus. There is nothing better than a student who is involved in something that interests them and meeting new people with similar interests! What a great way to make friends!

Talk with your child about their classes, how their professors are, when their midterms and finals are, etc. If you show interest in their schoolwork, you can help us identify any potential problems.

Check with your child to make sure he/she is meeting with their advisor.

Encourage your child to keep his/her eyes open for scholarship opportunities. When we find out about opportunities, we try to pass those on to students all the time.

Provide support. Send a card or care package, call them, be there for the rough times, and try to share the happy times too.

Your Part

Remember important dates; vacation days, midterms, finals, registration dates, tuition payment deadlines, and special events. Yes, your student is an adult now and is responsible for remembering this information, but they'll always need and appreciate your help.

Become familiar with the college and the resources available to the students, this will help in supportingyour child. (i.e. Tutoring services, career services, campus services, student life, etc).

If they don't call you every day, it's ok! Student life on campus is very busy. Hopefully your son or daughter will be busy keeping up with classes and getting involved on campus. It's ok to call, but set up a schedule to talk maybe once a week or every other week. This will go a long way in instilling independence as well as responsible behavior.

It will be hard to decide when to intervene and when to let your child figure things out for themselves. Your child may just need an opportunity to vent and you'll serve them well by offering advice, but letting them handle the challenges themselves.

The University's Part

We treat students like adults. They are not considered a number in our system, they are an individual.

We work with students to make sure they get the best out of their education.

We care. We try to make sure that your child is safe, happy and healthy, physically, mentally, and academically.